Making gum wrapper chains was and great way to spend a rainy or snowy afternoon. Although you might not have gum wrappers available, no problem! We used recycled gift wrap to make this chain. We have some ideas of what to do with this besides just making a long chain. (The longest one on record used 1,000,000 gum wrapper pieces. Yikes!)  Anyway, a very nostalgic craft that most children 6 and up can do. Once we get some length, we'll share some crafts to do with your chains. Happy chaining!

1] Cut used gift wrap into 1” x 2 3/4” pieces.

2] Fold piece in half lengthwise.

3] Open and fold either side into the center line you just created. The folded piece should measure approximately 1/4" x 2 3/4".

4] Fold in half along the length.

5] Open and fold either side into the center line you just created. You have just made 1 link.
Note: You have now created a “V”. 4 folds are visible on the front side of the “V” and 8 folds are visible on the wrong side of the “V”.

6] Make another link.

7] To join links slide your 2nd link through the 1st link through the 1st link’s front side, and with the wrong side of the 2nd link showing. Pull the 2nd link through the 1st link.

8] Make another link. Repeat the 7th step sliding your 3rd link through the 2nd link through the 2nd link’s front side, and with the wrong side of the 3rd link showing.

9] Continue in this manner making the zigzag chain as long as you like.

 
Note about patterns: We are sharing patterns we have designed and made for our own children, families and friends. Every effort is made to share information in a clear and accurate manner. We offer preemptive apologies for any mistakes that may be made. Please let us know via comments or emails if you stumble upon a mistake or if you encounter directions that leave your scratching your head! We will rectify the situation as soon as humanly possible!

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Comments

I spent my entire 6th grade year making a huge gumwrapper chain. All donated wrappers as I had braces and coulnd't chew gum!

Still have it. I drape it on my Christmas tree every year.

Here's a picture:

http://extremecards.blogspot.com/2008/12/gum-wrapper-chain-purse.html

Wow! That is quite a chain. Thanks for sharing.

Michelle

Wee Folk Art Publisher
 

Oh, looking at your chain makes me so envious! I don't know exactly when I got rid of my gum wrapper chain. It was probably in one of those weak moments, when I was packing for yet another move, that I decided to purge pieces of my youth. What I wouldn't give today to have the hatbox full of my middle school notes, folded into tight triangles, and passed in the halls or in class behind teacher's backs. I would love to read again how Linda heard that John told Yvonne that she heard Steve say that Chuck told Mark that he liked me! Or the scrapbook I had put together in the months following the assassination of JFK. Or, my gum wrapper chain. When you're in college, you're not, or at least I wasn't, as sentimental as I wish I had been. Anyway, thanks for sharing. Not only does it make a lovely addition to your tree, it is a colorful walk down memory lane! 

Kimara
Wee Folk Art Publisher
 

Oh, I know. I had a whole huge tin full of those notes. I remember re-reading them in college, finding them excruciating, and burning the lot. Maybe it's good thing. Would they be any less embarrassing 35 years later?

The gum wrapper chain survived because it was stapled to the ceiling moulding of my childhood bedroom. By the time my mother re-did the room I was old enough to appreciate it again.

Hi!

Today I posted an entry on my blog with a link to this tutorial.

Would you let me know if that's OK?

Thanks,

Nancy Ward
http://paperfriendly.blogspot.com

Links are always appreciated! It is great to share the fun.

Thanks! :)

Michelle

Wee Folk Art Publisher
 

Thank you. But how do you put the chains together to make something like a coaster, tote and etc? anyone know?????

Actually, what I was planning on doing was sewing them together much like you would a braided rug. You slip your needle with thread behind loops, which hides the thread. I still haven't done anything with mine, so I can't give first hand info. I've read that people join them using clear tape or glue. Sorry... it really is on my to-do list... it's just that my list is ever growing! Good luck! 

Kimara
Wee Folk Art Publisher