Michelle's blog

Waiting for Baby

In case you haven't read the news on Facebook yet. We had a false alarm... no baby to report yet. Baby and mom are doing fine... baby is just content to stay put for the moment, so we wait. Gammy (aka Kimara) packed up and headed out of state earlier than she had planned but is of course at this point just staying put as well... visiting, helping, and of course waiting.

It may be a bit quiet around these parts while Kimara is out of town and we get back into the groove of our school activities. Don't worry if there are fewer posts or if it seems eerily quiet. We have plenty of goodies to share with you this fall. You will just have to... well, wait a bit too. ;)

But I do think now is a great time to share a few projects I sent off for baby.

I finally got a chance to make the ever popular "Baby Surprise Jacket" by Elizabeth Zimmerman. I feel that there is some sort of right of passage in making a project that has been made so many times before. I couldn't help but feel a connection with all the other knitters who have made the same stitches before. It was a fun and quick knit. I used a self-striping, wash-able wool and had just enough left over to whip up (at the last minute) one of my Twirl and Tie Caps. It is now ready and waiting for baby.

Spicer's Autumn Leaves Hat and Scarf Set - Part 2

EDIT: There was an error in lines 11, 13 and 15 which has now been corrected. If you printed the copy of the pattern before, please make sure your line 11 reads as listed below :)

The other day I shared the pattern for the Spicer's Autumn Leaf Hat. Today I am sharing the pattern for the scarf. I LOVE the leaf pattern, and I like how thin the scarf is. It's a way to add great color and "toastiness", without all the bulk of a wide scarf.

The Spicer's Autumn Leaf Hat can be found HERE.

Spicer's Scarf Pattern

Size 8 needles
Worsted weight yarn (shown in Cascade 220 Quatro - colorway 5011)
Gauge is not important

Add this pattern to your Ravelry Queue.

CO 27 sts
Row 1: K5, SL1K, K2T, PSSO, K5, YO, K1, YO, K5, SL1K, K2T, PSSO, K5 (25 sts)
Row 2 and all even rows: P across
Row 3: K4, SL1K, K2T, PSSO, K4, YO, K3, YO, K4, SL1K, K2T, PSSO, K4 (23 sts)
Row 5: K3, SL1K, K2T, PSSO, K3, YO, K5, YO, K3, SL1K, K2T, PSSO, K3 (21 sts)
Row 7: K2, SL1K, K2T, PSSO, K2, YO, K7, YO, K2, SL1K, K2T, PSSO, K2 (19 sts)
Row 9: K2, YO, K1, YO, K5, SL1K, K2T, PSSO, K5, YO, K1, YO, K2 (21 sts)
Row 11: K2, YO, K3, YO, K4, SL1K, K2T, PSSO, K4, YO, K3, YO, K2 (23 sts)
Row 13: K2, YO, K5, YO, K3, SL1K, K2T, PSSO, K3, YO, K5, YO, K2 (25 sts)
Row 15: K2, YO, K7, YO, K2, SL1K, K2T, PSSO, K2, YO, K7, YO, K2 (27 sts)
Row 16: P27

Repeat row 1-16 until you have reached desired length.
BO after completing row 16 of the pattern.

K = Knit
P = Purl
SL1K = Slip 1 Knit-wise
K2T = Knit 2 Together
PSSO = Pass Slipped Stitch Over
YO = Yarn Over
CO = Cast On
BO = Bind Off

Completing the series, SL1K, K2T, PSSO will decrease 2 stitches.

http://www.weefolkart.com
Copyright © Wee Folk Art 2008 - 2012. All rights reserved.

All photos, text and patterns are copyright protected. You may not copy, reproduce or redistribute any material found on WeeFolkArt.com without written permission. Wee Folk Art retains all rights. Read our FAQs found HERE for specifics or contact us at weefolkart@yahoo.com if you have any questions.

Spicer's Autumn Leaves Hat and Scarf Set - Part 1

This is a project I worked on last fall but it seemed too late to share it when it was complete. Now with some cooler temperatures on the horizon, I'm sure many of you are itching to start some fall knitting projects. This hat and scarf set, adorned with a falling leaves lace pattern,  is named for one of our favorite local cider mills. The cozy, pumpkin color wool yarn from Cascade pairs nicely with fresh glass of cider and some warm cinnamon doughnuts.

The Scarf Pattern can be found HERE.

Spicer's Hat Pattern

Size 8 double pointed needles or 24” circular.
Worsted weight yarn (shown in Cascade 220 Quatro - colorway 5011)
Gauge is 4.75sts per 1”

Add this pattern to your Ravelry Queue.
 
Leaf Lace Pattern:
1st: *K1, YO, K5, SL1K, K2T, PSSO, K5, YO*  Repeat from * to *
2nd and all even rows, K
3rd * K2, YO, K4, SL1K, K2T, PSSO, K4, YO, K1*  Repeat from * to *
5th * K3, YO, K3, SL1K, K2T, PSSO, K3, YO, K2*  Repeat from * to *
7th * K4, YO, K2, SL1K, K2T, PSSO, K2, YO, K3*  Repeat from * to *
9th *K5, YO, K1, YO, K5, SL1K, K2T, PSSO*  Repeat from * to *
11th *K4, YO, K3, YO, K4, SL1K, K2T, PSSO*  Repeat from * to *
13th *K3, YO, K5, YO, K3, SL1K, K2T, PSSO*  Repeat from * to *
15th *K2, YO, K7, YO, K2, SL1K, K2T, PSSO*  Repeat from * to *
16th K
 
ADULT’s
CO 98
Join to work in round.
Knit 1 row.
Work 40 rows of Leaf Pattern which will give you 2.5 repeats of the leaf pattern. Over the next eight rows you will continue working the pattern rows 11-16 BUT omit all YOs as show below. This will reduce your stitch count by 14 each odd row and begin your cap shaping.
Leaf Lace Pattern changes for final 8 rows of the pattern:
9th *K11, SL1K, K2T, PSSO*  Repeat from * to * (84sts remain)
11th *K11 SL1K, K2Tog, PSSO*  Repeat from * to * (70sts remain)
13th *K11, SL1K, K2Tog, PSSO*  Repeat from * to * (56sts remain)
15th *K11, SL1K, K2Tog, PSSO*  Repeat from * to * (42sts remain)
16th K
 
Continue cap shaping by
K2T (21 remain)
K
K2T, until 1sts before marker K1 (11 remain)
K
K2T, until 1sts before marker K1 (6 remain)
Cut yarn and pull through remaining stitches.
 
CHILD’s
CO 84
Join to work in round.
Knit 1 row.
Work 24 rows of Leaf Pattern which will give you 1.5 repeats of the leaf pattern. Over the next eight rows you will continue working the pattern rows 11-16 BUT omit all YOs as show below. This will reduce your stitch count by 14 each odd row and begin your cap shaping.
Leaf Lace Pattern changes for final 8 rows of the pattern:
9th *K11, SL1K, K2T, PSSO*  Repeat from * to * (70sts remain)
11th *K11 SL1K, K2Tog, PSSO*  Repeat from * to * (56sts remain)
13th *K11, SL1K, K2Tog, PSSO*  Repeat from * to * (42sts remain)
15th *K11, SL1K, K2Tog, PSSO*  Repeat from * to * (28sts remain)
16th K
 
Continue cap shaping by
K2T (14 remain)
K
K2T (7 remain)
Cut yarn and pull through remaining stitches.

http://www.weefolkart.com
Copyright © Wee Folk Art 2008 - 2012. All rights reserved.

All photos, text and patterns are copyright protected. You may not copy, reproduce or redistribute any material found on WeeFolkArt.com without written permission. Wee Folk Art retains all rights. Read our FAQs found HERE for specifics or contact us at weefolkart@yahoo.com if you have any questions.

Stenciled Lizard T-Shirt and Shorts

Here we are doing yet another Freezer Paper Stencil. But as you can see, this method is really a splendid way to incorporate some personality into boys' clothing. I find as a crafty mother that I am sometimes hard pressed to find ways to bestow my crafty love onto my boy in something that he will actually wear (this seems to get harder every year). The girls' closet is full of mom-made beauties, but Bug has just a few well loved items. This shirt has made it into his favorites and matches wonderfully with the shorts I made him 3 years ago... gasp! (You can find info on the shorts below)


Ok, so if you have missed the How to Freezer Paper Stencil which we covered in our Leaf Shirt Blog (oh my gosh... talk about my folks being wee) and in our Snowflake Stencil Quilt... here is a super fast run down.

I used our Lizard Applique Block for the lizard pattern. Make a copy of the pattern and enlarged it until it's the right size for the shirt you are stenciling. (Check out our blog post on Enlarging and Reducing found HERE.)

Trace your image onto freezer paper.



 
Cut out the inside of the stencil.


 
Place the stencil shinny side down where you want it on your shirt (be sure to wash your shirt first).


 
Iron the stencil to the shirt using a warm iron.


 
Place an old paper bag, cereal box, etc in the middle of the shirt to prevent the paint from bleeding through.


 
Use a sponge brush to apply the fabric paint in a gentle up and down motion. Be careful not to get the paint under the edges... especially around the toes.


 
When dry, carefully peal away the paper.


 

Follow the directions on your fabric paint for setting the paint. Some require ironing after it dries. Wash your shirt according to your paint's directions.

 Your wee one is now ready to wear, enjoy and explore the world!
 
 
About word about the shorts...


In the blog world you can easily stack the years side by side to see how your wee ones have grown (click here to read about the shorts). Amazingly this series of shorts (McCall's Pattern 3193) which includes the pair pictured above (photo from July 2009) and two more have been a staple in Bug's summer wardrobe for so long now. They are just now starting to show wear and have become short enough this season that he may actually need some new ones for next summer :)
 

http://www.weefolkart.com
Copyright © Wee Folk Art 2008 - 2012. All rights reserved.

All photos, text and patterns are copyright protected. You may not copy, reproduce or redistribute any material found on WeeFolkArt.com without written permission. Wee Folk Art retains all rights. Read our FAQs found HERE for specifics or contact us at weefolkart@yahoo.com if you have any questions.

photos 6-11-12

Stamp Making

So, we've been talking quite a bit about letterboxing lately. If you've had a chance to get out and give it a try then you may have run across some fun... even amazing... homemade stamps. You can use any stamp as a signature stamp... but of course it would be even more fun to make your own. Here is a basic run down of how to make your own stamp using our spider applique block as inspiration.

NOTE: The most important thing to remember when making a stamp is that the image will print in reverse! So if you are incorporating any text into your design, the letters must read backwards on your stamp face. Don’t forget.

Ok, on to stamp making. What you need is a sheet of linoleum (or an eraser), carving tools and a razor. You can buy a basic Stamp Making kit for around ten-twelve dollars. The stamp in this tutorial was made using a kit. Optionally you may want a piece of 1-1.5” thick wood and super glue. You will also need a pattern or image scaled to the size of stamp you would like to make. For our project today, I scaled the spider image down to 50%. This is a good size stamp to use for letter boxing. Any smaller and it would be hard to carve, much larger and it may not fit in some of the journals that you find.

Transfer the image to your stamp material. I did this by rubbing pencil lead all over the back of the image and then traced it hard onto the stamp material (remember it will turn out backwards… but that is not an issue with just the little spider he can face either way).

Trace the faint lines with a permanent marker. You want nice thick lines. If your image is very detailed you will want to simplify somewhat. Fill in with the marker any part of the image that you want to show up on your stamp.

If you have a large sheet of linoleum, use a razor to cut out the image leaving at least a ½” boarder around your image. Using your carving tools, carefully shave away the non marker portion of the stamp face. I find that holding the carving tool still and moving the linoleum around was the easiest way to carve the initial outline of the shape.

You may want to trim up your stamp with the razor even more now.

Once you only have the black portion remaining test your stamp.

If you are getting wayward stamp marks, use your carving tools to smooth away any of the excess bumps. Test again.

Once you are satisfied with your stamp you can glue it to a small piece of wood to make it sturdier and easier to handle.

http://www.weefolkart.com
Copyright © Wee Folk Art 2008 - 2012. All rights reserved.

All photos, text and patterns are copyright protected. You may not copy, reproduce or redistribute any material found on WeeFolkArt.com without written permission. Wee Folk Art retains all rights. Read our FAQs found HERE for specifics or contact us at weefolkart@yahoo.com if you have any questions.

Patterns may be used for personal use only. If you are interested in obtaining a Cottage Industry License so you can sell items made from our patterns, information can be found HERE.

Syndicate content