Felt & Felting

Flower Fairies in the Garden

It's spring... that means it's time to revisit our Flower Fairies. Welcome back Flower Fairies!

If Fairy Dust is sprinkled on a flower as the last dew of morning evaporates, something magical happens... a Flower Fairy is born! If you are lucky enough to have Flower Fairies in your garden, then you already know that all of your plants seem to grow a little lovelier and their blooms seem to last a little longer… as if by magic!
 
Now, you can bring that magic indoors by crafting your own Flower Fairies. Long known to be great friends with the gnomes and woodland creatures, your Flower Fairies will easily join in the merry making with the rest of your wee folk.

Additional photos, free pattern and the TUTORIAL can be found HERE.


Copyright © Wee Folk Art, LLC 2008-2014. All rights reserved.

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Converting Our Hedgehog Applique into a Hedgehog Embroidery

Recently, Pixie, Fairy and their friend Sprite have been learning embroidery. It reminded me of how much I enjoy needlework. Right now they are learning the back stitch and French knots using an embroidery pattern we purchased of three adorable little girls. (I'll talk more about that when they are done.) I embroidered one of the little girls, too, and after talking to my DIL Meghan, decided to turn the piece into a pillow for Little Lady.

Of course, that means Little Guy needs a pillow, too. I decided to turn our Hedgehog Applique Block into an embroidery pattern. You could do the same with any of our FREE Applique Blocks. This is how I did it.

First, I made a copy of the pattern which can be found HERE. I then used my new light box to trace the pattern onto a piece of soft white cotton, using a water erasable marker. Of course, you can use any method to trace the pattern on a piece of cloth.

When I was done tracing the pattern it looked like this. You will notice the lines that indicate the ground and how the vine just stops.

Since I wanted the design to be in the middle of a pillow, and I wanted to leave space all the way around it, using the water erasable marker, I free-hand continued the vine to go around the back and under the hedgehog. Notice two things... first, I used the same type of curls I used above the hedgehog, and two, I was none too neat about it! What a mess! But I didn't worry about the mess, because the marker is erasable with water. No worries!

Now I was ready to start stitching.

Directions for how to make all the stitches used can be found in our Stitching Glossary.

I used a back stitch and 2 strands of standard DMC embroidery floss on everything accept the "berries". For the nose and eyes I began by outlining them, then I went back and filled them in with back stitches. If you would like, you could use a satin stitch. Note: Satin stitches are longer, and can easily get caught and snagged. If I was doing this as a wall hanging, I would consider using a satin stitch, but since it will be a pillow, which will be carried around, I wanted small stitches throughout the piece.

For the berries, I used 3 strands of DMC floss, and made French Knots.

I used a 7" embroidery hoop.

When I was done, the hedgehog looked like this.

Notice how I improvised on the back of the vine. Doesn't matter, all the blue lines will disappear!

Finally, I sprayed the piece using a fine mist, and like magic, all the blue markings disappeared!

Wah lah... here is our Hedgehog all done, ready to be turned into the center panel of a pillow. I love the retro 1940's feel it has to it. I'll share that as soon as I can unearth my sewing machine!


 

Copyright © Wee Folk Art, LLC 2008-2014. All rights reserved. Please do not reproduce our text, images or patterns without prior written consent. Please contact us with any questions.

Photos 3-25-14

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Froggy Umbrella Applique Block

When Bug was just a wee lad, he was in love with his frog umbrella. You'd never hear him complain on a rainy day because out came "Froggy" and together the 2 would brave the elements. Bug was also known to tote Froggy on sunny days, too. You just can't spend enough time with a good friend, can you?

Bug still has Froggy, but he's gotten to the age when he's more apt to make a mad dash to his destination in the rain rather than take the time for a leisurely walk with his frog. So, let's call this my ode to Froggy Umbrella. He served Bug well!


As with all blocks, our Froggy Umbrella Applique was designed for a 6" x 6" block, but can be reduced or enlarged to meet your needs. Enjoy!

The pattern for the FREE Froggy Umbrella Applique Block can be found HERE.

The tutorial on How to Enlarge and Reduce can be found HERE.

The tutorial on How to Cut Out Felt can be found HERE.

The Stitching Glossary can be found HERE.

Refer to pattern and photo for applique placements and cutting instructions.

Make a copy of the pattern.

Cut out felt using the pattern as a guide. Transfer any embroidery markings.

Using a running stitch, sew eyes to block using 2 strands of floss.

Using a running stitch, sew umbrella cane to block using 2 strands floss.

Using a blanket stitch, sew umbrella section "a" to block using 3 strands floss. Note: Where section "a" will be covered by umbrella sections "b" and "c", use a running stitch. 

Using a blanket stitch, sew umbrella sections "b" and "c" over umbrella section "a" using 3 strands floss.

Using a running stitch, sew cheeks to umbrella using 2 strands floss.

Using a running stitch, sew irises to eyes using 2 strands floss.

Using a running stitch, sew handle to cane using 2 strands floss.

Using a stem stitch, add  mouth using 6 strands floss.

Add French knots to section points using 6 strands floss.
 

Copyright © Wee Folk Art, LLC 2008-2014. All rights reserved. Please do not reproduce our text, images or patterns without prior written consent. Please contact us with any questions.


Photo 1-7-10

 

Please With A Cherry On Top Applique Block

As a child, if we wanted something really bad, we'd say, "Please with a cherry on top?" because who can resist a cherry on top? I know I can't. I could eat an entire jar of maraschino cherries, but, oh, having just one on top makes just about any sweet treat all the more special! Today we are sharing our Please With A Cherry On Top Applique Block. Here is a totally yummy cupcake, oozing with frosting, and the pièce de résistance... a cherry on top, of course! Like all our appliques, this one was designed to fit on a 6" x 6" block but it can be reduced or enlarged to meet your needs.

Yum... right?
 

The pattern for the Please With A Cherry On Top FREE Applique Block can be found HERE.

The tutorial on How to Enlarge and Reduce can be found HERE.

The tutorial on How to Cut Out Felt can be found HERE.

The Stitching Glossary can be found HERE.


DIRECTIONS - Refer to pattern and photo for applique placements and cutting instructions.

Make a copy of the pattern.

Cut out felt using the pattern as a guide. Transfer any embroidery markings.

Using a blanket stitch, sew cupcake bottom to block using 3 strands floss.

Using a blanket stitch, sew first the bottom icing, then the middle icing, and finally the top icing to block using 3 strands floss. Use the pattern to determine the overlap.

Using a running stitch, sew cherry on cupcake using 2 strands floss.

Using a running stitch, sew leaves to block using 2 strands floss.

Using a stem stitch, add cherry stem, leaf detail, and cupcake stripes using 6 strands floss.

Using a straight stitch, add "sprinkles" to cupcake icing using 6 strands of floss. Use a random pattern for color placement.
 

Copyright © Wee Folk Art, LLC 2008-2014. All rights reserved. Please do not reproduce our text, images or patterns without prior written consent. You may use one or two images on your blog as long as you reference Wee Folk Art and share a direct link back to our page. Please contact us with any questions.


PHOTO: 9-24-09

 

Cheaters Guide to Dying Wool Felt

I have a confession to make... I cheat. There, I said it. Oh, not in anything important like a game of Candyland with the wee ones or on my taxes, BUT, I'm always on the lookout for shortcuts. Sometimes, I've made some awesome discoveries that I use over and over again, other times I've experienced some scathingly brilliant disasters! (There is a ponytail incident that comes to mind, but that truly is a blog in and of itself!)
 
Anyway, one of my many cheats... or let's just call them time savers... is when I dye felt. There are MANY sites out there that give great tutorials on how to dye wool that include heat and a setting agent. You should probably go read some of them... seriously : ) Today, I'm going to share how I dye wool felt to get the soft, subtle color variations that I love using a non-traditional, cheaters-shortcut.

A couple of things to know... these are not considered "colorfast". I do not do anything to "set" the color in, because I am using the felt for items that do not get wet, and I've yet to have any problems with the colors rubbing off or getting on your hands when they are made into toys. Remember... this is not an official tutorial on dying felt. This is my own fast and easy method. If you want to try it, make 1 piece of felt and make it into something. Use it for a while and see what you think. It works for me but might not be what you need.

So, having said all that, let's get started. All you need is a white piece of 100% wool felt and some food coloring.

I begin by getting the piece of felt completely wet using warm water. Squeeze out extra water. The felt will probably looked crumpled, and might even "felt" or shrink a bit. I'm okay with that!

Next, get out a jelly roll pan and put just enough water in it to cover the surface.

Now, squirt some drops of food coloring on the surface. I usually use 2 colors and lightly swirl.

This is what magically happens when you swirl blue and yellow... you get green, tah dah! If you wanted blue, you can do the same technique using only blue food coloring and leaving "white space" in the pan.

Here is some yellow and orange food coloring.

Place your piece of felt in the jelly roll pan, and press down. Do not move it around. You want to pick up the swirls and give it a mottled look. If you move it too much you will wind up with a solid color. (No photo for that step. Sorry!)

Remove the felt from the pan.

Using rags or paper towel, blot off some of the extra water.

Set on a wire rack to dry completely. I occasionally move the felt around the rack and turn it over while it is drying. This will stop the felt from developing lines from the rack.

That's all there is to it. When the felt is completely dry, you can use it for making gnomes and other projects. Notice the variation in color. I love it!

Before anyone asks, I get most of my felt from A Child's Dream. They got some of the loveliest felt around!
 

Copyright © Wee Folk Art, LLC 2008-2014. All rights reserved. Please do not reproduce our text, images or patterns without prior written consent. You may use one or two images on your blog as long as you reference Wee Folk Art and share a direct link back to our page. Please contact us with any questions.

Photos 1-22-14, 2-4-14

 

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