Household

Rip and Tear Napkins


For a practical, no sew, no glue project, rip yourself some new napkins! In the easy peasy category, these napkins are quick to make, and quick to launder. Basically, you need 1/2 yard of 44" wide fabric for 2 napkins. So, just decide on how many napkins you want and buy 1/2 yard for every 2. VERY IMPORTANT: no matter how many napkins you plan to make, always add 1/8 yard (4.5 inches) to the amount of fabric you need. Seldom are fabrics cut true to grain, and you will need some extra fabric for your first and last tears.

NOTE: Unless you bought fabric that is dyed through and through or has individually dyed threads as found in plaids, there will be a right and wrong side to these napkins. I find this to be more than acceptable for everyday use. If you prefer you can sew two pieces together instead of unraveling the edges but it will require twice as much fabric, and they take longer to dry.

For twelve (12) 18" x 18" napkins

Materials:
3 1/8 yards 44/45" fabric

Directions:

1] General: To rip fabric make a cut with scissors about 1" into fabric, trying to follow the grain of the fabric. Firmly hold the fabric on either side of the cut and rip the fabric all the way through the other side.


A: 1st rip: Rip approximately 2" from one cut end (non selvage side) of the fabric.

B: 2nd rip: Rip 1" from selvage. (You will rip off the entire selvage on one side.)

C: 3rd rip: Rip 18" from 2nd rip.

D: 4th rip: Rip 18" from 3rd rip.

E, F and all remaining rips: You will now have 2 long strips. Make rips every 18" giving you 18" x 18" square.

2] Beginning at a corner, unravel a side, by removing 1 thread at a time. Unravel 1/4" - 1/2" of threads depending on how wide you want the "fringe". Unravel all 4 sides.

3] On woven fabrics, often the warp (lengthwise threads) and the weft(cross grain threads) are not perpendicular to each other (right angles) like they should be. To see if your fabric is, fold one of your napkins in half. If your corners do not match up, then the grain line is off and you will need to adjust it.

4] To adjust the grain line, grab a short corner and its diagonal corner. Tug on the two corners. Refold the fabric and see if the corners match. If not, repeat the tugging until they do. Usually, after you've adjusted the warp and weft you will not need to do it again.

Your napkins are now done and ready to use!

TIPS ABOUT LAUNDERING: You may find after your first  or second launderings, that a few more threads come off or that the grain is slightly askew. Simply follow the steps for straightening the grain as explained above the first time or two they are washed, and they should stop shifting. Also, most of today's woven cotton fabrics require no ironing if a little attention is given when laundering. Wash your napkins in the usual manner, however, before throwing them in the dryer, vigorously shake them out, giving them a good "fluffing". If an edge is turned under, stretch the fabric between your fingers until the fabric lies straight. Do not over crowd the dryer. And, fold the napkins as soon as they are done drying. They should not require ironing. 
 

Note about patterns: We are sharing patterns we have designed and made for our own children, families and friends. Every effort is made to share information in a clear and accurate manner. We offer preemptive apologies for any mistakes that may be made. Please let us know via comments or emails if you stumble upon a mistake or if you encounter directions that leave you scratching your head! We will rectify the situation as soon as humanly possible!

http://www.weefolkart.com
Copyright © Wee Folk Art 2008 - 2009. All rights reserved.

All photos, text and patterns are copyright protected. You may not copy, reproduce or redistribute any material found on WeeFolkArt.com without written permission. Wee Folk Art retains all rights.

 

Rip and Tear Napkins


I love cloth napkins. I could never bring myself to use paper. First, they don't work very well, and second, waste paper? I think not! Over the years I've bought and made many different kinds of napkins. Recently, however, I've started making what I refer to as "rip and tear" napkins. Simply find a high quality 100% woven cotton fabric you love, measure, and tear!

Yesterday I was at our local craft store. I had a list and I wasn't going to deviate from it. (You can imagine how well THAT worked!) Anyway, I stumbled upon this absolutely adorable piece of fabric, aptly named "trick or treat" by Alexander Henry. (One of my "favoritest" of favorite fabric designers!)

Well, let it be known, I am not a pillar! I immediately snatched up the bolt and got a 3 1/8 yard piece lopped off. I knew that this piece of fabric was going to be our new Halloween napkins! The embarrassingly easy Rip and Tear Napkin directions can be found HERE or in the FREE Open Patterns. Enjoy!  

Koala Bookmark


A sweet little koala from Down Under is busy reading A Year Down Yonder! Make your own koala bookmark as a reading pal!

Materials:
wool felt
embroidery floss
yarn
pattern

1] Make copy of pattern.

2] Cut out materials as follows:
1 back - gray
1 body - gray
1 arm - gray
1 head - gray
2 ears - gray
18 - 28 leaves - green
3 pieces different colored green yarn 30" long each
2 eyes - white
1 nose - black

3] Following pattern, position nose on head. Using 3 strand of floss, attach nose to face using a small running stitch. Position eyes. Attach by placing a French knot in the center of each eye. Using 6 strands of floss, add mouth using a stem stitch.

4] To make the vine, knot the 3 pieces of yarn together 1” from an end. Braid the 3 pieces until you are 6” from the end. Knot the tail close to the end of the braiding section. Cut the extra yarn leaving 1” beyond the knot. (You may wish to braid the vine to the end, and wait to cut the length until you've added the leaves to insure even leaf placement.) 

5] Using 2 leaf pieces for each leaf, begin by sewing a leaf around the end of the vine. You will be covering the knot. Add leaves ever 2". (If you want a leafy vine, just add more.) Stagger the leaves so they are on different sides. NOTE: To add the leaves begin by sewing up 1 side of the leaf. Then open the leaf and place the vine inside on an angle. Continue your running stitch catching the vine at the top of the leaf and then again along the other side of the leaf. (Refer to photos.) You may want to leave the leaf off the vine that is around the koala's head. So, after adding your 2nd set of leaves, place the next set 4" down the vine. Then continue with every 2". Place your last set of leaves around the other knot.

6] Lay the body on the pattern. Using the pattern as a guide, lay the vine on the Koala. Pin in place.

7] Using 3 strands of floss, sew ears, body, head and arm to the backing using small running stitches. Sew on in order listed.

8] Using 6 strands of floss, add the leg outline using a stem stitch.

9] If you haven't already, finish the vine.

10] Share your favorite book with your new buddy!

Three Birdies Glass Case


When you're creative, nothing in your life needs to be boring. Here is a totally fun glass case that would be equally comfortable hanging out with an adult or child. Crafted from soft felt and flannel, adorable through and through, if you don't wear glasses, you're going to wish you did!

Materials:
1 piece felt and 1 piece flannel 7" x 8"
felt scraps
embroidery thread
small flower buttons
pattern

1] Make copy of pattern.

2] Cut out the inside and outside of the glass case. Decide on the colors for your birds and cut out all pieces and leaves.

3] Using the pattern as a guide, mark the vine on the felt, and following the directions on the pattern, embroider the vine, Add the leaves. (There will be places where part of the birds will cover part of the leaves. This will give the piece a dimensional look.)

4] Following the pattern, applique on the birds, building the bird as you go along. (i.e. First applique on large body piece, then on 2 birds, the head piece. Next, add the wings, beak, then eyes.) Although not on the pattern, I embellished the birds using 6 strands of embroidery. I used french knots, cross stitches, and straight stitches. You can leave them plain, following my suggestions, or come up with any embellishment you'd like. Perhaps you'd like to add beads. Go crazy!

5] Finish the embroidery by adding the various flowers and buttons. If you don't have flower buttons, cut out felt ones or use another decorative embroidery stitch. NOTE: I did not sew on the top flower button until after I sewed the outside to the inside. It is so close to the edge it could have interfered with sewing the pieces together.

6] Pin the inside to the outside with right sides together. 

7] Sew them together leaving a 2" opening on the bottom back side. 

8] Trim the corners to reduce some of bulk, turn, and lightly press. Slip stitch the opening closed. Add your last button.

9] Fold the glass case lengthwise, matching bottom and sides. The embroidery side should be on the outside. Starting on the front at the top opening, blanket stitch down the side and bottom. Make sure your stitches are tight, but not so tight that the sides are puckering. Your work should lay flat.

Tah Dah! You're done. Slip your glasses inside and they'll rest comfortably until you are ready to wear them again!

Note about patterns: We are sharing patterns we have designed and made for our own children, families and friends. Every effort is made to share information in a clear and accurate manner. We offer preemptive apologies for any mistakes that may be made. Please let us know via comments or emails if you stumble upon a mistake or if you encounter directions that leave your scratching your head! We will rectify the situation as soon as humanly possible!

Copyright © Wee Folk Art 2008 - 2009. All rights reserved. All photos, text and patterns are copyright protected. You may not copy, reproduce or redistribute any material found on WeeFolkArt.com without written permission. Wee Folk Art retains all rights. All projects, patterns and directions are meant for your personal use and neither the patterns nor completed projects may be used for personal gain.

 

Three Birdies Glass Case


Reading is fun! Should we settle for ho-hum glasses or glass cases? BAH! Our glasses and their accessories should be every bit as enjoyable as our books and bookmarks. So... here's my latest additional to our reading corner... a glass case that's sure to please young and old alike! The outer case is made of felt, while the lining is a super soft flannel. After one evening of crafting, you can get rid of your boring glass case and proudly whip out your Three Birdies and revel in the oohs and awes it produces! The directions and pattern for the Three Birdies Glass Case can be found HERE or in our FREE Open Patterns. Enjoy!

Syndicate content