Household

Christmas Tree Picture Ornament

 

Every year Michelle adds a picture ornament to the tree with Bug's, Fairy's and Pixie's pictures and year. This year I made the ornaments using our Christmas Tree Applique Block. The wonderful thing about this ornament, besides being adorable :) is the pocket on the back. The pocket makes it possible to give this as a gift and the recepient simply needs to add a trimmed down wallet sized photo. BTW... this is a pic of Bug two years ago... while going through his Beatles... particularly George Harrison... phase! I love the locks!

Anyway... this ornament lends itself to plenty of personalization. Add a date, a name, buttons or embroidered ornaments. If you'd like to make your own, the directions for our Christmas Tree Picture Ornament can be found HERE or with our FREE Patterns. Enjoy!

Christmas Tree Picture Ornament


Every year Michelle puts an ornament on the tree with her children's pictures, commemorating that year with a date and pic. This year I used our basic Christmas Tree Applique Block to make the personalized Christmas Tree Picture Ornaments. Make one for each of your children. Because there is a pocket on the back for sliding in a picture, you can easily give these as gifts and let the recipient add their own wallet sized photo! HO HO HO!

Materials:
Green felt for tree and pocket
Yellow felt for star
Embroidery floss
8" 1/4" ribbon
Optional: Acid free photo protectors
Pattern

1] Make copy of pattern..

2] Cut out felt pieces.

3] Mark the circle on the tree front. Pin the front to the back. Cut out the circle cutting through the front and back together.

OPTIONAL: If you wish to personalize the tree, including name and/or date do it now. Use a disappearing marker to write info, then stitch on to the front only using a stem stitch or backstitch with 3 strands of floss. You may also choose to add buttons for ornaments or embroidery stitches. (Note: in this pic you will notice the sides are already blanket stitched together... that's because I forgot to take a pic when I should have... opps!)

4] Blanket stitch the front to back around the hole using 6 strands of floss. 

5] Position the pocket on the back. Pin in place attaching only to the back piece. Do not catch the front tree.

6] Stitch the pocket in place using a running stitch on 3 strands of floss. Only stitch 3 sides. Do not stitch the top. This is where the photo slides in. Be careful not to stitch through to the front tree.

7] Using 6 strands of floss, blanket stitch the front and back together around outside edges.

8] Trim your photo until it fits in the pocket and is centered.

9] Optional: If you want to protect your photo, cut out a piece of a acid free photo protector sheet the size of your photo. (Easiest to use if you cut it on a fold.) Please the photo inside. Use a very narrow piece of tape to close the top.

10] For your hanger cut a piece of 1/4" ribbon 8". Position the ribbon on the front of the tree so you make a loop. Cross the ends about 1". Tack the ribbon in place as indicated on the pattern.

11] Cut out 2 pieces of felt for the star.

12] Sew the 2 star pieces together with a running stitch and 3 strands floss.

13] Position the star over the crossing section of the ribbon. Using 6 strands of floss, sew the star to the tree with 4 French knots. Place them so they look like button holes.

14] Trim the exposed edges of ribbon on an angle.

Now, hang it on the tree and keep the memories forever!   


 
 
Note about patterns: We are sharing patterns we have designed and made for our own children, families and friends. Every effort is made to share information in a clear and accurate manner. We offer preemptive apologies for any mistakes that may be made. Please let us know via comments or emails if you stumble upon a mistake or if you encounter directions that leave you scratching your head! We will rectify the situation as soon as humanly possible!

http://www.weefolkart.com
Copyright © Wee Folk Art 2008 - 2009. All rights reserved.

All photos, text and patterns are copyright protected. You may not copy, reproduce or redistribute any material found on WeeFolkArt.com without written permission. Wee Folk Art retains all rights.

 

Sweater Flambe

Thanksgiving is behind us and ahead "looms" Christmas. Sounds rather ominous, doesn't it? If you are responsible for preparing a holiday meal, especially if it is your first attempt, the thought of "messing it up" can be daunting. Below is a story I shared November 13, 2007 on my recently retired blog One Generation to Another. I thought now was an appropriate time to share it in case you just came through a Thanksgiving dinner fraught with mishaps or if you're nervous about the prospect of entertaining over the next few weeks. Hope you enjoy!  

Without pondering it, quickly think of 3 memorable days in your life. Chances are you’ll list the day you graduated from high school or college, got married, had your first child, got your first substantial promotion or some other equally pleasant, but innately ordinary event. Life is full of satisfying experiences, thank goodness, but they are seldom the type of stories that enthrall an audience and have them leaning forward in their seats, anxiously awaiting the outcome. When hearing these stories we politely listen, give well timed agreeable nods, and secretly prepare grocery lists or review tomorrow’s agenda. Thank God we are programmed with the ability to multitask! (Hmmm, okay, not all of us are proficient multitaskers, but at least most of us can go to our happy place and resurface at the finale of a mind-numbing story!) Let’s face it…it’s the goofs, the blunders, the mishaps, the screw-ups, the mix-ups, the gaffes, the errors, and the mistakes that make for the best stories and most repeatable tales.

Case in point…Like most women, before getting married I went out on my fair share of dates. Most of them were nice, some of them were boring, BUT, it’s the awful dates that I’ve recounted over the years. Take my date with the Congressional Page, aka, persistent frat boy determined to woo me. We were having a run-of-the-mill date at a lovely restaurant, followed by drinks at a bar frequented by state politicians. He was in the middle of laying out his 15 year plan to become a state senator. I was thinking about the guy in my Anthro class that started growing a beard. Slightly catatonic I took a drink of my Bloody Mary. (FYI…if you decide not to utilize the straws inserted in your libation, remove then before guzzling your drink, if not, you’re apt to wind up with a straw up your nose.) Yep, when I set my drink down, one of the straws remained in my nose. True story! Now, here’s an etiquette question that Emily Post was probably never asked…what do you do with a straw that you’ve removed from your nose? Do you put it back in your drink? Perhaps drop it on the floor? Call the waitress over and ask her to clear the table? As it was, I nonchalantly laid it on the table between us, and neither one of us mentioned the incident. Periodically, I’d notice him looking down at the straw. I think he was assessing my ability to function as a state senator’s wife. Well, I didn’t marry the boy, but he didn’t become a state senator either! Humiliated myself, maybe, but came away with a great story! (BTW…he did ask me out again…go figure!) (And BTW…I didn’t go out with him again…guess the incident was just too mortifying…or more to the point, he was monumentally boring!)

Then there was the time I was putting on a lovely Christmas dinner for a group of friends. The atmosphere was enchanting! The lights were off and the table was totally illuminated by a myriad of candles. Soft instrumental Christmas music played in the background. The conversation was peppered with laughter and good cheer. And, in all due modesty…(right!)…the food was superb! Halfway through dinner I reached across the table to pass a condiment. As I went to sit down a unified gasp arouse from my dining companions. “Oh my God, Kim. Your sleeve’s on fire!” Sure enough, when reaching across the table, I also reached across a candle that decided to test my sweater’s flammability tolerance. It failed! (Note to self: Next time I’m around open flames wear kids’ pajamas!) Well, without much effort I was able to extinguish the flames. Actually, all it really did was quite efficiently remove those nasty sweater boogers that collect on the surface of knits, although I can’t suggest this method as the preferred technique for defuzzing a sweater! But to the point…I can almost guarantee you that no one remembers what I made for dinner that night, but EVERYONE at dinner remembers the Sweater Flambe, and I often get good naturally teased about it.

About now you may well be asking yourself, “Uh, is there a point to this story?” And the answer is indubitably YES! Life is about taking chances and not all of them will turn out the way you planned. Your path will be littered with mishaps, but in the long run, it doesn’t matter as long as you get a good story out of it! Heck, most of the history books are filled with “Oops!” So, don’t be afraid to try new things, and when faced with embarrassing or seemingly unbearable situations (like the day I started a new job working in the stock room of a dress shop, slipped, fell backwards into an open box, and wound up with my skirt around my waist as my fellow employees tried to pull me out or the time I roomed with a woman who actually believed she was the reincarnation of Mary Magdalene, prior to meeting Jesus) remember that it is the goofs and blunders, trials and tribulation, that with time, and an occasional sprinkling of embellishments, become great stories to remember and share!

FYI…just in case you’re wondering…for dinner that night I served my mother’s recipe for Beef Bourguignonne. It is a little labor intense but well worth the effort when you want to make a lasting impression on dinner guests…maybe not as lasting as igniting yourself, but it will certainly delight and impress your company!

BEEF BOURGUIGNONNE

My mom stumbled upon this recipe many years ago and used it for “special occasions”. I’ve yet to see her make it without someone asking her for the recipe!

Ingredients
4 tablespoons butter
4 pounds round or chuck, cut in 2-inch cubes
1/4 cup Cognac
1 cup chopped onion (1 large)
2 cloves of garlic, mashed
1 teaspoon salt
1 bottle Burgundy
2 teaspoons tomato paste
1 can (10-1/2 oz) condensed beef broth
2 bay leaves
1 teaspoon leaf thyme
2 sprigs parsley
1/4 teaspoon pepper
1 pound mushrooms, sliced
24 small white pearl onions, peeled
4 tablespoons flour
4 tablespoons soft butter or margarine
1 teaspoon grated lemon rind
2 tablespoons chopped parsley

Directions

Brown beef well on all sides in 4 tablespoons butter. Add only enough beef to kettle to cover bottom or beef might stew and not brown.

Remove browned pieces before adding more beef. When beef is browned, pour off any fat. Return beef to kettle. Heat Cognac in small saucepan; ignite carefully; pour over beef. When flames have died, add onion, garlic, salt, pepper, bay leaves, parsley, thyme, wine, tomato paste and 1/2 cup of beef broth.

Bring to boiling; lower heat; cover and simmer 2 to 2-1/2 hours or until beef is tender.

Heat 3 tablespoons butter or margarine in skillet; saute mushrooms quickly until just tender; remove; reserve. Add small white pearl onions to fat remaining in skillet; brown well. Add remaining beef broth; bring to boil, cover, lower heat; simmer about 10 minutes or until onions are tender. Blend flour and 4 tablespoons butter or margarine to form smooth paste. (This is the thickening for the bourguignonne, called beurre manie.)

Add beurre manie bit by bit to hot liquid until it has reached desired thickness. Stir in lemon rind. Return beef to kettle; add onions and mushrooms. Heat until bubbly; sprinkle with parsley. Serve with small boiled potatoes, buttered noodles or rice.

(May be oven cooked in large, covered casserole. Cook at 350 degrees for 2 to 2-1/2 hours or until tender. Remove from oven; thicken liquid over direct heat.)

So, if you're responsible for a major Holiday celebration, relax and enjoy it! What's the worse that can happen? Even if EVERYTHING goes wrong, people will still walk away with an entertaining story to share for years to come. In the long run, that probably has more value than a perfect meal!

Calico Mason Jar Cover


This is the simplest Mason jar cover around... so simple it hardly needs instructions!
 
Materials:
Calico fabric
1/4" ribbon
Mason jars

1] Find a round object (I used a 7" sandwich plate) the size of the cover you want, and trace a circle on your fabric.

2] Using pinking shears, cut out the circle.

3] Unscrew the outside band of the Mason jar. Leave the lid on. Center the fabric circle over the lid and screw the band back on.

4] Tie the ribbon around the band. Trim ends to desired length. DONE!

Note about patterns: We are sharing patterns we have designed and made for our own children, families and friends. Every effort is made to share information in a clear and accurate manner. We offer preemptive apologies for any mistakes that may be made. Please let us know via comments or emails if you stumble upon a mistake or if you encounter directions that leave you scratching your head! We will rectify the situation as soon as humanly possible!

http://www.weefolkart.com
Copyright © Wee Folk Art 2008 - 2009. All rights reserved.

All photos, text and patterns are copyright protected. You may not copy, reproduce or redistribute any material found on WeeFolkArt.com without written permission. Wee Folk Art retains all rights.

Hot Chocolate Mix and Calico Mason Jar Cover

One of the true delights of cold winter days is a toasty warm cup of hot chocolate. Growing up, my Mom ALWAYS had a tin of this instant hot chocolate mix in the cupboard. If stored in an air tight container, it can last up to 6 months in the pantry. Plenty of time to get you through the cold winter months! For gift giving purposes, this recipe filled 9 quart sized Mason jars. Yum!

INGREDIENTS
2 boxes 8 quart instant milk
2 pound box Nestles Quick
2 pounds powdered sugar
1 11 ounce jar of coffee creamer* 

DIRECTIONS
Mix thoroughly and store in an air tight container.

To make: Mix 1/3 cup mixture to a cup of hot water. May add miniature marshmallows after powder is dissolved.

*If you prefer not to use a coffee creamer in your mix, add an additional 11 ounces of powdered milk. The mix will not be as creamy, but it is still hot and yummy.

The directions for the super easy, super fast Calico Mason Jar Cover can be found HERE or with our FREE Patterns. Enjoy!  

Note about patterns: We are sharing patterns we have designed and made for our own children, families and friends. Every effort is made to share information in a clear and accurate manner. We offer preemptive apologies for any mistakes that may be made. Please let us know via comments or emails if you stumble upon a mistake or if you encounter directions that leave you scratching your head! We will rectify the situation as soon as humanly possible!

http://www.weefolkart.com
Copyright © Wee Folk Art 2008 - 2009. All rights reserved.

All photos, text and patterns are copyright protected. You may not copy, reproduce or redistribute any material found on WeeFolkArt.com without written permission. Wee Folk Art retains all rights.

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