Knitting & Crocheting

It's A Girl!


We just found out last week that my son Drew, and his wife Meghan, are having a baby girl! We are all very excited... well ALMOST everyone is excited. Poor Bug is surrounded by girls and was hoping that his new cousin would be a boy. Pixie and Fairy couldn't be more excited and are already making plans.

So, now that we know that the baby is a girl... (no names decided on yet, so Drew started referring to her as the Little Lady) I am now ready to start crafting for her.

The other day Michelle and I were at the bookstore. We had a mound of books stacked on a table, and armed only with a cup of coffee, set out to be inspired. Michelle discovered this book... Fairy Tale Knits. It is gorgeous!

Often, when I look at crafting books, I see 1 or 2 projects I'd like to make. This book was jam packed with adorable knit projects that I know the grandbabies would love. I especially loved that fact that there were awesome projects for boys. There is a Robin Hood sweater that I plan to make for Bug.

But, right now, I need to make a few things for the Little Lady :) I saw this adorable afghan... actually, they refer to it as a Magic Carpet... you can see that, right? What fun! Okay, it is not that practical. The finished size is only 36" square BUT it is such a sweet blanket for a baby to lay on. Then it will make a wonderful afghan to be shared with dollies when Little Lady is older. So, I personalized the colors and decided not to put the pom-poms on the ends. (I didn't think the afghan needed them, and I didn't want a potential choke hazard.) This afghan went so fast, and I managed to get it done in a week.

One project done, many more to go. I'll keep you posted. 

  

A Whimsy of Knit Gnomes


I have always been fascinated by unique collective nouns. For instance, did you know a group of mice is called a "mischief"? Sounds about right, doesn't it?  Or that dolphins travel in pods? Other names are band, horde, tribe, and coalition. (For a bunch of animal collective nouns, check out this list.) When I went to post this tutorial, I began to wonder what I should call a gathering of gnomes. Since nothing brilliant or witty came to me, I settled for a Cluster of Gnomes. Any ideas?

EDIT: One of our readers, Cami, suggested calling a group of gnomes a Whimsy of gnomes. I love the idea so much, from now on I will always referring to a group of gnomes as a "whimsy". Thanks Cami!!!

Here is the hat pattern that will allow you to turn our Basic Knit Dolls into Gnomes. The pattern for the Basic Knit Dolls can be found HERE. Decide which size doll you would like to make and follow the directions. 
 

3" dolly
4" baby
5" toddler
8" child
10" mother
12" father

Make sure you read about gauge, materials and stitches. When you have completed the doll, use the directions below to knit and attach the gnomey hat.  The 3 dolls in the photo at the top of this tutorial are the 5" toddler. The lone green gnome at the bottom is the 8" child. Directions are given for the 3" doll with sizes 4", 5", 8", 10" and 12" in parentheses. The gnome pictured in the directions is the 8" child.

Using size 6 needles, or a size that obtains the gauge, cast on 10 (15, 20, 30, 40, 50) leaving an 18" tail for sewing.

Working in a stockinette stitch (knit one row, purl one row) knit 2 (4, 6, 6, 8, 8) rows for hat rim.

Odd rows: (the right side) Knit 2 together. Knit across the row to the last 2 stitches. Knit 2 together.

Even rows:  (the wrong side) Purl.

Continue until you have 1 stitch left on your needle. Clip the yarn leaving an 18" tail for sewing and pull it through the last loop .  

Pin the side seams together, with the wrong sides together.

Beginning at the top of the hat, sew the side seam using the yarn tail at the top of the hat. Catch only I piece of yarn on either seam.

Gently pull the yarn on the first few stitches causing the top of the hat to curl.

Continue sewing the seam. Tie off and clip the yarn.

Lightly stuff the hat with fiberfill. You just want enough fiberfill to prevent the sides from caving in. Do not overfill or it will look like a clown's hat.

Before beginning to sew the hat to the gnome, on the inside, weave the yarn tail along the seam up 2 (4, 6, 6, 8, 8) rows. Poke the needle through to the outside.

Note: You will be sewing the hat to the gnome several rows above the hat edge. When you are done sewing on the hat, you will roll the rim upward. When positioning the hat on the gnome, remember that the first several rows will be rolled. Take that into account when deciding on placement.

Position the hat on the gnome so that the beginning of the hat, excluded the rows of rim, are touching the gnome's body in the back. Make sure the body and hat seams are lined up.

Slant the hat at a pleasing angle, remembering that part of the hat will be rolled up. Pin in place.

Sew the hat to the gnome using a running stitch. This stitch should be 2 (4, 6, 6, 8, 8) rows up from the bottom edge of the hat. You should go in and out of each stitch, making sure to catch the head beneath.

When the hat has been attached, tie off and clip the yarn.

Gently roll up the rim. It will stay in place without sewing it down.

http://www.weefolkart.com
Copyright © Wee Folk Art 2008 - 2010. All rights reserved.

All photos, text and patterns are copyright protected. You may not copy, reproduce or redistribute any material found on WeeFolkArt.com without written permission. Wee Folk Art retains all rights.  

Basic Knit Doll in 6 Sizes


EDIT: These designs were created with beginner knitters in mind. They are knitted flat and are sewn together. For a more experienced knitter, I have created directions for knitting the dolls in the round, using double pointed needles, thus eliminating the seams. Also, directions are giving for adding a face and hair. Those expanded directions for a Basic Knit In the Round Doll can be found HERE. 

If you would like to add a Gnome Hat, the pattern can be found HERE.

Few things bring more joy to a child than snuggling with their special doll. We have created a basic doll pattern in 6 sizes: 12", 10", 8", 5", 4", and 3", enough to create a whole family or village. THIS IS OUR BASIC KNIT DOLL PATTERN. Over time we will be using this basic pattern to make many different dolls. When we do, we will refer you back to this pattern, and share alterations, embellishments, and perhaps a story or two :)


Below are the general directions for making knit dolls. As time goes on we will share many different projects that begin with this basic doll pattern. The directions are for 6 sizes. First, there are directions for the four larger dolls:

5" toddler
8" child
10" mother
12" father

Then, there is another set of directions for making:
4" baby
3" dolly

Stitches:
You can chose to knit the bodies and arms in a garter stitch (knit every row) or a stockinette stitch (knit 1 row, purl 1 row). The garter stitch produces horizontal lines and creates a nubbier surface.

The stockinette stitch creates vertical lines and a smoother surface.

Just like clothing, the horizontal lines of the garter stitch tends to make the dolls look plumper, whereas the stockinette stitch with its vertical lines, makes the dolls appear thinner. It is all a matter of choice. ALL FACES should be knit in the stockinette stitch. 

Materials:
These dolls should be knit using worsted weight yarn. I prefer to use 100% wool because it stands up to play better than acrylics which tend to ball up over time. Because dolls will be played with by children, they will need cleaning from time to time. Wool will felt and shrink but I found if you stuff the dolls with an acrylic fiberfill instead of wool roving, they will not flatten out, and they will maintain their shape. I found I could wash a doll in with my normal wash (cold wash, cold rinse) and even tumble dry on warm, with minimal shrinkage. Note: The stockinette stitch will felt and shrink a bit more than the garter stitch. 

Needles:
Size 6 needles or needles that fit the gauge.

Gauge:
22 stitches and 28 rows = 4" square in stockinette stitch

IMPORTANT: Leave long yarn tails (12" - 18" depending on the size of the doll) when you cast on or when you cut yarns. These will be used for sewing up the dolls.

DIRECTIONS FOR TODDLER, CHILD, MOTHER AND FATHER DOLLS

Directions are written for the 5" doll. Additional sizes are in parentheses as follows: 5" (8", 10", 12")

Leg 1:
Loosely cast on 10 (15, 20, 25) stitches.
Work in garter stitch or stockinette stitch for 10 (16, 20, 26) rows.
Do not bind off but cut the yarn.

Leg 2: 
Slide the first leg to the back of the needle, and loosely cast on 10 (15, 20, 25) stitches.
Complete as you did for the first leg but DO NOT cut the yarn.

Body:
Slide the two legs together. You will now have 20 (30, 40, 50) stitches.
Knit across the row, treating the 2 separate legs as one. This will create the body.  

Continue working in your pattern for 16 (24, 32, 40) rows.

Cut yarn.

Head:
Switch to head color.
Work in stockinette stitch for 10 (16, 20, 26) rows.

DO NOT bind off.
Cut thread.
Thread the end through a yarn needle. Slide the needle through each stitch as you remove them from the knitting needle. Later, this will be pulled tight to gather the stitches.

Sew Doll Together:
Thread a yarn tail at the bottom of a leg and sew a close running stitch across the bottom of a leg.

Pull the thread tight, gathering the leg edge. Tie off but do not cut yarn.

With right sides together, sew up the inseam. Tie off this yarn tail with the yarn tail that is at the crotch. DO NOT CUT THIS YARN. Weave in the yarn tail that you used to sew the inseam and clip.Do the same for the other leg.

Use the yarn tail at the crotch to sew up the back of the body. Tie it off with the matching yarn tail where the body meets the head. Weave in this yarn tail and clip. Leave the other body yarn tail long.

Using the head yarn tail at the base of the neck, sew up the back of the head. Tie off this yarn and weave in the tail and clip. Turn the doll right side out. Using a yarn needle, pass the remaining long body yarn tail that is at the neckline from in inside of the doll to the outside. This will be used later to form the head.

Stuff the doll.

Pull the yarn tail at the top of the head that was slipped through the stitches. By pulling it tightly, you will gather the top of the doll's head. The knit head should be wrinkle free. If you have wrinkles around the top of the head, try adding a little more stuffing. When satisfied, tie it off. Note: On the larger dolls you might create a "hole" in the top of the head. If so, simply sew the hole closed by making little stitches across the hole.

Tie off the thread, and work it into the doll. Clip. 

Forming head:
To form the head, thread the body yarn tail remaining at the nape of the neck. Using a running stitch, go in and out of every stitch all around the neck.

When you've gone all around, pull the thread firmly to create a neck. When you are pleased with the shape of the head and neck, tie off the yarn, and work the thread into the doll and clip the thread.

Arms:
Using the body yarn, loosely cast on 8 (12, 16, 20) stitches.
Work in garter stitch or stockinette stitch for 12 (18, 24, 30) rows.

DO NOT bind off.
Cut thread.
Thread the end through a yarn needle. Slide the needle through each stitch as you remove them from the knitting needle.

Pull the thread tight, gathering the arm edge. Tie off but do not cut yarn.

With right sides together, sew up the inseam of the arm. Tie off this yarn tail with the yarn tail at the top of the arm. DO NOT cut the arm tail at the top of the arm. Weave in the yarn tail that you sewed the seam with and clip.

Stuff the arm.

Position the arm 1 or 2 rows below the neckline, with the arm seam against the body. The arms should be at the dolls sides but slightly towards the front of the doll.

Stitch the arm to the doll. Since young children might decide to chew on an arm, I always double sew an arm on for extra safety.

Make the second arm in the manner described above and attach.

DIRECTIONS FOR DOLLY AND INFANT DOLLS Note: Read all the general directions at the top of the page concerning materials, needles, gauge, stitches and yarn tail lengths. Because these are knit and sewn together in the same fashion as the larger dolls, refer to those pictures if you need clarification.

Directions are written for the 3" doll. Additional size is in parentheses: 3" (4")

Body:
Loosely cast on 10 (15) stitches.
Work in garter stitch or stockinette stitch for 14 (18) rows.
Cut the yarn.

Head:
Switch to head color.
Work in stockinette stitch for 6 (10) rows.
DO NOT bind off.
Cut thread.
Thread the end of the yarn tail through a yarn needle. Slide the needle through each stitch as you remove them from the knitting needle. Later, this will be pulled tight to gather the stitches.

Sew Doll Together:
Thread a yarn tail at the bottom of the body and sew a close running stitch across the bottom edge.

Pull the thread tight, gathering the bottom edge. Tie off but do not cut yarn.

With right sides together, sew the seam until you reach the head. Tie off this yarn tail with the yarn tail that is at the neck. DO NOT CUT THIS YARN. Weave in the yarn tail that you used to sew the seam and clip.

Using the head yarn tail at the base of the neck, sew up the back of the head. Tie off this yarn and weave in the tail and clip. Turn the doll right side out. Using a yarn needle, pass the remaining long body yarn tail that is at the neckline from in inside of the doll to the outside. This will be used later to form the head.

Stuff the doll.

Pull the yarn tail at the top of the head that was slipped through the stitches. By pulling it tightly, you will gather the top of the doll's head. The knit head should be wrinkle free. If you have wrinkles around the top of the head, try adding a little more stuffing. When satisfied, tie it off. Note: On the larger dolls you might create a "hole" in the top of the head. If so, simply sew the hole closed by making little stitches across the hole.

Tie off the thread, and work it into the doll. Clip.

Forming head:
To form the head, thread the body yarn tail remaining at the nape of the neck. Using a running stitch, go in and out of every stitch all around the neck.

When you've gone all around, pull the thread firmly to create a neck. When you are pleased with the shape of the head and neck, tie off the yarn, and work the thread into the doll and clip the thread.

No Arms - I made the infant and dolly without arms to look like they are swaddled.

OUR "DISCLAIMER"! We are sharing patterns we have designed and made for our own children, families and friends. Every effort is made to share information in a clear and accurate manner. But we are only human, although I often long for superhuman powers, and as humans, mistakes will be made. We offer preemptive apologies for any aforementioned mistakes. Please let us know via comments or emails if you stumble upon a mistake or if you encounter directions that leave you scratching your head! We will rectify the situation as soon as humanly possible! Before beginning any of our patterns, think of yourself as a Beta Tester. We do not have a staff, editors or even volunteers that are crafting our projects before we share them. YOU are the first to have a go at them. As such, other than a heartfelt apology, we accept no responsibility for mistakes made, or in an extreme circumstance, for time or supplies wasted. Please tackle our projects in the same manner that we are sharing them, with a spirit of goodwill and global friendship!

http://www.weefolkart.com
Copyright © Wee Folk Art 2008 - 2010. All rights reserved.

All photos, text and patterns are copyright protected. You may not copy, reproduce or redistribute any material found on WeeFolkArt.com without written permission. Wee Folk Art retains all rights.

Basic Knit Doll Family


Few things bring more joy to a child than snuggling with their special doll. We have created a basic doll pattern in 6 sizes: 12", 10", 8", 5", 4", and 3", enough to create a whole family or village. THIS IS OUR BASIC KNIT DOLL PATTERN. Over time we will be using this basic pattern to make many different dolls. When we do, we will refer you back to this pattern, and share alterations, embellishments, and perhaps a story or two :) 

Instructions for the Basic Knit Doll Pattern can be found HERE or with our FREE Patterns. Enjoy!

Special Note: As I posted yesterday, we just lost our dog, Scully. I've been working on these patterns with a heavy heart and often a clouded brain. PLEASE let me know if you find ANYTHING that is wrong or doesn't make sense. Thanks. 

Essay: What I Did on Spring Break by Kimara


As a child, it never failed, when you returned to school after any break or vacation, your teacher was sure to say, "I would like you to write an essay titled, "What I did on my vacation". This was usually followed by a collective groan, except for Margo. Margo was the class know-it-all who actually enjoyed homework. As a matter of fact, when you asked Margo what she did do on her vacation, her list usually included writing an essay on what she did on her vacation. She liked to get a jump on things. For the rest of us, this task was tedious enough to ALMOST make us wish we hadn't gone on vacation in the first place!

So, here I am, back from vacation, feeling like I should be writing on essay on What I Did on Spring Break. Well, lucky for me, no one is grading this, and although it will take me a few days to get back into my normal routine, I'm actually excited to share my adventures... at least my crafting adventures. So, here goes...

For some time now, Michelle and I have been talking about creating an all purpose doll pattern. Just a basic pattern in multiple sizes, that can be adorned in various ways to meet our needs. I spent the week pouring through my old patterns and books, visiting many websites, and unraveling many unsatisfying attempts. Finally, I put together an easy, very versatile pattern, that can be used in many ways, and can be made in many sizes. (The largest size is still on my needles, so it is not pictured!)

We begin with the basic doll:

You can add a little hair:

You can add gnome hats:

You can even make them removable clothing:

Over the next few months, we will start with the basic doll pattern, and share many variations. We will be making clothing, adding faces to some, and all sorts of fun hairdos. We will even be turning them into some animals! Tomorrow I will share the basic pattern that can be used to make:

Daddy - 12"
Mommy - 10"
Child - 8"
Toddler - 5"
Baby - 4"
Dolly - 3" 

So, there you have it... my crafty doings over break! Hope everyone had a lovely week, missed you all, and it's nice to be back! 
 

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