Knitting & Crocheting

Spring Crocheted Rag Rugs for the Gnomes (or Coasters)

 

The directions for the Flower Fairies pictured below can be found HERE.


I hate to waste anything when I'm crafting. You never know, right? So, I have bits and pieces of this and that in jars, in baskets, tucked in cubbies, and hanging from the ceiling. It is amazing how many times I hit these "should throw away" stashes!

Well, the other day I made my April (Easter) Rip and Tear Napkins.

This is what was left over.

On the next sunny day (5 days of rain in the forecast), we will go outside and drape the pieces of string in tree and bush branches, and throw them hither and yon in our green belt. Birds and field mice will use them to help make their spring nests comfy-cozy. (You're welcome little friends!)

But, I have a special plan for the fabric scraps that were ripped away from the napkins. I will be making a couple new Spring Crocheted Rag Rugs for the gnome house. (They can also be used as lovely spring coasters!) I made a basic circle. I've included the directions below. If you would like to "see" the basics on how to crochet a circle, check out our Bean Bag and Coaster Directions.

Spring Crocheted Rag Rug for the Gnomes (or Coasters)

Materials:
scrap fabric strips (ripped to about 3/8") 

Note: To have one continuous strip of fabric to crochet with, simply overlap the end of one piece with the start of a new piece. Sew them together. You do not need to be neat... it's a rag rug :)

Directions:

1] Chain 6.

2] Slip stitch through 1st chain to form a ring.

3] First Round: Chain stitch 3. This is called your “turning chain” and will be counted as your 1st stitch. Next, crocheting through the hole in the center of the ring, double crochet 9 times. Slip stitch in the top (the third chain) of the turning chain. You will now have 10 stitches (including the turning chain).

4] Second Round: Chain stitch 3. Double crochet into the base of your “turning chain”. You will be increasing 10 stitches this round. In the remaining 9 stitches from the first round, double crochet twice in each stitch. Slip stitch in the top chain of the turning chain. You will now have 20 stitches.

5] Third Round: Chain stitch 3. Double crochet into the base of your “turning chain”. You will be increasing 10 stitches this round. In the next stitch double crochet once, in the next stitch double crochet twice. Continue this pattern double crocheting twice every other stitch. Slip stitch in the top chain of the turning chain. You will now have 30 stitches.

6] Fourth Round: Double crochet into the base of your “turning chain”. You will be increasing 10 stitches this round. In the next two stitches double crochet once, in the third stitch double crochet twice. Continue the pattern double crocheting twice every third stitch. Slip stitch in the top chain of the turning chain. You will now have 40 stitches. Slip stitch in the top chain of the turning chain and pull the strip through.
 
7] Using a yarn needle, weave the beginning and ending fabric tails into the rug. Clip close to the rug.

If you would like to continue making the rug slightly larger, you can add 1 or 2 more rows, continuing in the pattern established above, increasing 10 stitches each round.

 

http://www.weefolkart.com
Copyright © Wee Folk Art 2008 - 2010. All rights reserved.

All photos, text and patterns are copyright protected. You may not copy, reproduce or redistribute any material found on WeeFolkArt.com without written permission. Wee Folk Art retains all rights.

Sleeping Out


Britta was awaken by the lovely sound of birds singing in the forest trees. When she opened her eyes, however, she realized she was much closer to the forest than she had been when she went to sleep the night before. It seemed that at some time during the night, the bed that she shared with Axel, was removed from their home and carried far into The Thicket. Leprechauns! Britta thought of waking Axel, then took a deep breath, smelling the intoxicating fragrance of the mossy ground and the pine trees, and she snuggled back under the warm covers, snickered quietly and whispered, "No harm done" before falling back into a gentle sleep.

Directions for making the bed, mattress and pillow can be found HERE.

Knitting Instructions for Spring Bedspread

Materials:
size 3 knitting needles
sock yarn (You might like... Regia Kaffe Fassett Sock Yarn - Exotic Clay)

Note: for this pattern you you need multiples of 4 stitches plus 2

1] Loosely cast on 42 stitches.

2] Repeat the 4 rows of the pattern until piece measures 7".

Pattern:
Row 1: K2, *P2, K2 (repeat from * to end of row)
Row 2: P2, *K2, P2 (repeat from * to end of row)
Row 3: Knit row
Row 4: Purl row

3] Loosely cast off. Weave in ends.

http://www.weefolkart.com
Copyright © Wee Folk Art 2008 - 2010. All rights reserved.

All photos, text and patterns are copyright protected. You may not copy, reproduce or redistribute any material found on WeeFolkArt.com without written permission. Wee Folk Art retains all rights.

Hairpin Lace Instructions


I finally finished Part 4 of the hairpin lace tutorial. If you would like to try this technique, I hope you find this tutorial helpful. Although there are tons of pics and instructions, I tried to break each individual step down. In a perfect world, I would be able to have everyone over for a cup of tea, cozy up on the couch, and show them how to do this very easy technique in 15 minutes. But, alas, that is just a cyber dream! So, since I can't do that, I'm hoping the detailed instructions will answer all questions and make the learning process easy.

This tutorial is strictly instruction on how to make hairpin lace. There are no projects listed. If you Google hairpin lace projects you will find many. You will also find different ways of joining the loops, and even ways to make them into circles, instead of strips. You can also use them for making lace. There are so many fun and interesting ways you can use hairpin lace.

The Afghan I'm Making:
The only things I've ever made with hairpin lace are afghans. I put 348 loops on each strip, and I'm making mine 30 strips wide. This is going to be a BIG afghan... I'm thinking about 84" x 60" without the fringe. But I wanted one that could fit across the laps of everyone sitting on our big leather couch! I find I get 2 strips from skein of 4.5 oz (128g), 268 yds (245 m) worsted with enough left over to make fringe. I am only using 2 colors: sage (S) and a variegated (V) in sage, off white and tan. I'm make the following pattern:

4S-2V-3S-2V-3S-2V-3S-2V-3S-2V-4S 

I will share pics and notes when I'm done making mine, but chances are it won't be in the next few weeks. I seem to drag my feet on those large projects, even though hairpin lace goes fast. I takes about 1 1/2 hours to crochet a strip, and 15 minutes to join 2 together.

I'm thinking how pretty this would be to make for baby dolls, using naturally dyed yarns in soft, muted colors... or for the bottom of Pixie and Fairy's bed... we are going to be redecorating their room soon... Michelle's thinking, bright tropical colors... what fun it would be to work with those yarns... but I digress.

So... with a very quiet drum roll, are the 4 parts of the tutorial. Have fun!

Part 1 - The Loom

Part 2 - Crocheting the Strips

Part 3 - Joining the Strips

Part 4 - Finishing the Project

Although we normally do not share links to other sites on the blog, we mainly reserve that for Facebook, if you know of a cool hairpin lace project out there, feel free to link to it in this comments section!

Hairpin Lace Part 4 of 4: Finishing Your Project

NOTE: Since the original posting of Part 4 - Finishing Your Project, my mom reminded me of an easier way to finish off the project. It totally gets rid of my stage 3... weaving in the ends. Thank you, Mom! The directions found below have been updated and reflect the change. Changes made within the remaining directions will be denoted in red. I left in the stage 3... weaving in the ends. Some people may still want to finish off their project in this manner. In order to eliminate stage 3, your yarn tails must be the same color as the tassels you are adding, otherwise you would have an odd colored yarn in your tassel. So, If you are using tassels that are a different color than the yarn tails, DO NOT incorporate the yarn tails in the tassel, and use stage 3 to weave in ends. (3-8-10) 

You have now finished crocheting and joining all your strips. Time to finish it up. We will do this in 2 or 3 stages: Finishing the outside edges, adding tassels and (optionally... weaving in ends).

Finish Outside Edges:
1] To finish off an edge, work on the right side of your project, and begin at the bottom. Place the first 6 loops on your crochet hook. (6 loops on hook)

2] Slide the 3 loops closest to the end of crochet hook (end loops) over the other 3 loops closest to the hook (front loops), allowing the 3 end loops to come off the hook. (3 loops on hook)

3] Pick up the next 3 loose loops. (6 loops on hook)

4] Continue taking the ends loops off the crochet hook by sliding them over front loops, then picking up the next 3 loops.

5] When you get to the last 3 loops, pull a yarn tail through the 3 loops and loosely tie.

6] Do the other edge in the same manner.

Add Tassels: 

NOTE: If your yarn tail are a different color than the tassels you are adding next to it, DO NOT incorporate the yarn tail in the tassel. Follow the remainder of the tassel instructions leaving the yarn tails alone. After the tassels have been added, proceed to Stage 3... weaving in the ends, and finish your afghan.

1] The yarn tails from each strip can be incorporated into the same colored tassel next to it. To prepare a yarn tail, begin by sliding your crochet hook from the front to the back, sliding the hook between the first three loops of one strip and the first three loops of the other strip.

2] Grab a yarn tail from either strip and pull it through the 6 loops. Let it stay there until you are ready to add your tassel. (Note: You want the yarn tail to be the same color as the tassel. If you have crocheted different colored strips, you may want to add different colored tassels. Do it in a manner that is pleasing to you. You can incorporate a yarn tail from either side for the tassel, you can even incorporate both, as long as they are the same color as the tassel you are adding.)

3] To make a tassel, find a "board" you can wrap yarn around that is approximately 8" long. I used the top of a container. You can also use a book or cut a piece of cardboard to the desired length.

4] Loosely wrap yarn around your board 8 times and cut yarn.

5] Slide the loops off the board, holding the top of the loops in your left hand.

6] When adding tassels on the bottom edge; slide your crochet hook from the back to the front, sliding the hook between the first three loops of one strip and the first three loops of the other strip.

7] Grab the top of the tassel you are holding in your left hand, and pull the tassel through the 2 sets of loops about 3".

8] Slide your yarn tail over and hold it with the other ends of the tassel.

9] Take the bottom of the tassel and feed through the top loop of the tassel.

10] Gently pull on the bottom until the knot formed in step 6 is secure. Do not pull it too tightly. You do not want to misshape the loops on your strips.
11] Cut the bottom loops of your tassel, so there are now 16 individual pieces of yarn. If necessary, even the bottom of the tassel by cutting off long pieces.

12] When adding tassels to the top edge; untie the knot holding two strips together. Repeat steps 6 - 12.

NOTE: You will only need to weave in the ends if you did not incorporate your yarn tail into your tassel as described in Stage 2 - Adding Tassels.

Weave in Ends:
1] Turn project over so back is showing. Each yarn tail will need to be woven into the back.

2] Thread a yarn tail into a yarn needle.

3] Weave the yarn tail through the center crochet of each strip, making sure not to poke through the front of your piece. 

4] Weave each piece in 1" - 1 1/2". Clip the thread close to the piece.

You are now done! Easy, right? BTW... The examples used in this tutorial are for an afghan I'm making. I am not done with it yet so I can't give you the "finished picture". When I am done, I will include the pic, in these instructions.

Part 1 - The Loom

Part 2 - Crocheting the Strips

Part 3 - Joining the Strips

Part 4 - Finishing the Project

 
OUR "DISCLAIMER"! We are sharing patterns we have designed and made for our own children, families and friends. Every effort is made to share information in a clear and accurate manner. But we are only human, although I often long for superhuman powers, and as humans, mistakes will be made. We offer preemptive apologies for any aforementioned mistakes. Please let us know via comments or emails if you stumble upon a mistake or if you encounter directions that leave you scratching your head! We will rectify the situation as soon as humanly possible! Before beginning any of our patterns, think of yourself as a Beta Tester. We do not have a staff, editors or even volunteers that are crafting our projects before we share them. YOU are the first to have a go at them. As such, other than a heartfelt apology, we accept no responsibility for mistakes made, or in an extreme circumstance, for time or supplies wasted. Please tackle our projects in the same manner that we are sharing them, with a spirit of goodwill and global friendship!


http://www.weefolkart.com
Copyright © Wee Folk Art 2008 - 2010. All rights reserved.

All photos, text and patterns are copyright protected. You may not copy, reproduce or redistribute any material found on WeeFolkArt.com without written permission. Wee Folk Art retains all rights.
 

Hairpin Lace Part 3 of 4 - Joining the Strips


Joining the strips is as easy as 1, 2, 3... quite literally.

NOTE: There is a front and back AND a top and bottom. ALWAYS join strips on the front of your project starting at the bottom. (The bottom is defined as the edge where you began joining your first 2 strips)

1] Working from the left side of your project, lay 2 completed strips side by side. Unroll just enough of the the strips so you can work with them, being very careful not to twist the strips.

2] Think of your strips as even and odd, with your first strip (1) on the left beginning odd. When joining 2 strips, ALWAYS start with an odd strip.

3] Place the first 3 loops from the odd strip on your crochet hook. (3 loops on hook)

4] Place the first 3 loops from the even strip on your crochet hook. (6 loops on hook)

5] Slide the original 3 loops from the odd strip over the 3 loops from the even strip and take them off the hook. (3 loops on hook)

6] Pick up the next 3 loops from the odd strip. (6 loops on hook)

7] Slide the original 3 loops from the even strip over the 3 loops from the odd strip and take them off the hook. (3 loops on hook)

8] Continue weaving the 2 strips together until you reach the end of the strips. Check the backside of your work about ever 30 loops to make sure you didn't skip a loop. If you did, it will be sticking out in the back.

9] When you get to the last 3 loops left on your hook, pull a strip tail through the loops and loosely tie. ( You will finish the ends better in part 4 of this tutorial, Finishing Your Project.)

10] Continue adding strips in this manner until your project is the desired width. After the first 2 strips, you will be adding additional strips to your "growing" project; in my case an afghan. Remember to ALWAYS start with 3 loops from an ODD strip. EDIT: If you not, your afghan will slant, as each new strip will be higher than the one before.

Later in the week I will share Part 4 of 4: Finishing Your Project.

Part 1 - The Loom

Part 2 - Crocheting the Strips

Part 3 - Joining the Strips

Part 4 - Finishing the Project

OUR "DISCLAIMER"! We are sharing patterns we have designed and made for our own children, families and friends. Every effort is made to share information in a clear and accurate manner. But we are only human, although I often long for superhuman powers, and as humans, mistakes will be made. We offer preemptive apologies for any aforementioned mistakes. Please let us know via comments or emails if you stumble upon a mistake or if you encounter directions that leave you scratching your head! We will rectify the situation as soon as humanly possible! Before beginning any of our patterns, think of yourself as a Beta Tester. We do not have a staff, editors or even volunteers that are crafting our projects before we share them. YOU are the first to have a go at them. As such, other than a heartfelt apology, we accept no responsibility for mistakes made, or in an extreme circumstance, for time or supplies wasted. Please tackle our projects in the same manner that we are sharing them, with a spirit of goodwill and global friendship!

http://www.weefolkart.com
Copyright © Wee Folk Art 2008 - 2010. All rights reserved.

All photos, text and patterns are copyright protected. You may not copy, reproduce or redistribute any material found on WeeFolkArt.com without written permission. Wee Folk Art retains all rights.

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