Knitting & Crocheting

Checkerboard Mittens and Scarf


When we made plans to take a trip to visit my son and his wife, I wanted a project that I could work on in the car, and one that wouldn't be too complicated. I designed this pattern to be attractive but also easy enough that I could knit in the car, while talking to others or watching movies. No complex cables, just a very easy to follow, very repeatable pattern. I think I accomplished both goals. I love the way they turned out... I've been wearing them about town already :) and these patterns are suitable for beginners/advanced beginners.

The directions for the scarf can be found HERE or with our FREE Patterns.

The directions for the mitterns can be found HERE or with our FREE Patterns. Enjoy!

Checker Board Scarf


Believe it or not, there is still time to knit a scarf for a Christmas gift... or, be self indulgent like me  ;) and knit one for yourself to help keep you toasty warm over the winter months. This scarf is an easy pattern to knit, suitable for beginners that know how to knit and purl. It is a basic checkerboard pattern, with blocks made up of 4 stitches and rows. It matches our Checkerboard Mitten (coming soon) pattern. It would look lovely made up in soft wools. I, unfortunately, am allergic to wool, so I made mine out of an acrylic. This scarf is best knit with solid yard. Patterned and self striping yarn would camouflage the pattern. Whether you make the scarf and mittens or just the scarf, it's sure to keep you warm!

Checkerboard Scarf
(Finished length: approximately 74”)

2 skeins (5oz – 140g – 256yd – 234m) worsted weight (4) yard
(I used Red Heart – Soft Yarn – Color 9770 – Rose Blush)
#8 knitting needles
Tapestry needle

Size:
Finished scarf is 74 inches long and 7 ½” inches wide. Gauge is not critical. (NOTE: Make the scarf as long or as short as you want. 60” is often considered a good scarf length but I wanted the scarf to wrap around my neck and still offer chest warmth so I made mine longer than many.)

Instructions:
Cast on 38 stitches.

Rib (38 stitches)
Row 1: (K2, P2) repeat across row ending with K2.
Row 2: (P2, K2) repeat across row ending with P2.
Rows 3, 5, 7, and 9: repeat Row 1.
Rows 4, 6, and 8: repeat Row 2.
Row 10: repeat Row 2 adding 2 stitches evenly spaced across row. (40 stitches)

Scarf Body (40 stitches)
Rows 1 – 4: (K4, P4) 5 times across row.
Rows 5 – 8: (P4, K4) 5 times across row.
Repeat these 8 rows until scarf measures 72” or 2” less than desired length. (NOTE: End with a row 4 or Row 8, decreasing 2 stitches evenly spaced across row. (38 stitches)

Rib (38 stitches)
Row 1: (K2, P2) repeat across row ending with K2.
Row 2: (P2, K2) repeat across row ending with P2
Rows 3, 5, 7, and 9: repeat Row 1
Rows 4, 6, 8, and 10: repeat Row 2
Bind off.

Note about patterns: We are sharing patterns we have designed and made for our own children, families and friends. Every effort is made to share information in a clear and accurate manner. We offer preemptive apologies for any mistakes that may be made. Please let us know via comments or emails if you stumble upon a mistake or if you encounter directions that leave you scratching your head! We will rectify the situation as soon as humanly possible!

http://www.weefolkart.com
Copyright © Wee Folk Art 2008 - 2009. All rights reserved.

All photos, text and patterns are copyright protected. You may not copy, reproduce or redistribute any material found on WeeFolkArt.com without written permission. Wee Folk Art retains all rights.

Checkboard Mittens

These mittens are easy to knit, suitable for advanced beginners. It is a basic checkerboard pattern, with blocks made up of 4 stitches and rows. It matches our Checkerboard Scarf pattern. They would look lovely made up in soft wools. I, unfortunately, am allergic to wool, so I made mine out of an acrylic. These mittens are best knit with solid yard. Patterned and self striping yarn would camouflage the pattern. Whether you make the scarf and mittens or just the mittens, they are sure to keep you warm!

Supplies:
1 skein (5oz – 140g – 256yd – 234m) worsted weight (4) yard
(I used Red Heart – Soft Yarn – Color 9770 – Rose Blush)
#8 knitting needles
#6 knitting needles
Tapestry needle
1 stitch holder
2 stitch markers

Size:
Women’s Average/Large. (To customize, increase or decrease hand and thumb length as needed.)

NOTE: When I refer to a “stripe” I am talking about 4 rows of the pattern below that create a box; it does not refer to the entire 8 rows of pattern, which create 2 “stripes”.

INSTRUCTIONS - Make 2 mittens. Right and left hand are the same.
Ribbing:
(36 stitches)
Cast on 36 stitches using #6 needles.
Row 1: (right side) (K2, P2) repeat across row.
Repeat Row 1 until cuff measures 4 ½”. End at the end of a right side row.
On wrong side: K2, Increase 1 in the next stitch. Continue pattern to last 3 stitches from the end of the row. Increase 1 in the next stitch. P2. (38 stitches)

Hand: (38 stitches)
Change to #8 needles.
Knit in the following pattern:
Row 1: (right side) P1, *K4, P4; repeat from* 4 times; K4, P1.
Row 2: K1, *P4, K4; repeat from * 4 times; P4, K1.
Row 3: repeat Row 1.
Row 4: repeat Row 2.
Row 5: K1, *P4, K4; repeat from * 4 times; P4, K1.
Row 6: P1, *K4, P4; repeat from * 4 times; K4, P1.
Row 7: repeat Row 5.
Row 8: repeat Row 6.
Continue working pattern until piece measures 2” from the end of ribbing. (For my mittens I completed 12 rows, completing 3 “stripes”.

Thumb Gusset:
NOTE: The thumb, or stitches between the markers, is worked in the stockinette stitch. (Knit 1 row, purl 1 row.)
Row 1: Work 18 stitches in pattern; place marker on needle; increase 1 stitch on the next 2 K stitches; place marker on needle. Work remaining 18 stitches in pattern. (40 stitches)
Row 2: Work pattern for 18 stitches; purl the stitches between the markers; work 18 stitches in pattern.
Row 3: Work pattern for 18 stitches; slide marker; increase in next stitch; K to stitch before next marker, increase in next stitch; slide marker; work remaining 18 stitches in pattern. (42 stitches)
Repeat Rows 2 and 3 until there are 14 stitches between the markers; end by working Row 2. (52 stitches)

Placing Thumb on Stitch Holder and Working Hand:
Work 18 stitches in pattern; remove marker; knit 14 stitches for thumb; place thumb stitches on holder; work remaining 18 stitches in pattern. (36 stitches)
Work remaining stitches in pattern (see note) until piece measures 7 ½” from start of hand; end by working a wrong side row. (For me that was 13 “stripes”)NOTE: The blocks in the mitten pattern were created by working 4 stitches by 4 rows. Now, stitches 18 and 19 will create a “half” block. (2 stitches by 4 rows) These will become the mitten fold when they are sewn together.

Top Shaping: (36 stitches)
NOTE: The top of the mitten is worked in the stockinette stitch.
Row 1: *K2, K2 together; repeat from * across row. (27 stitches)
Row 2: Purl.
Row 3: *K1, K2 together; repeat from * across row. (18 stitches)
Row 4: Purl.
Row 5: *K2 together; repeat from * across row. (9 stitches)
Cut yarn leaving a 20” tail. Thread into a tapestry needle and slide through remaining stitches, removing them from the needle. Pull yarn tightly and fasten securely. Leave yarn for sewing mitten together later.

Thumb: (14 stitches)
Slide stitches from holder to the needle. Attach yarn and purl row.
Work even in stockinette stitch until thumb measures 2 ¼”. NOTE: Measure from the “V” created where the thumb is attached to the hand on the inside.
Next row: *K2 together; repeat from * across row.
Cut yarn leaving a 12” tail. Thread into a tapestry needle and slide through remaining stitches, removing them from the needle. Pull yarn tightly and fasten securely. Leave yarn for sewing thumb together.

Finishing:
Sew thumb together.
Fold mitten and sew seam.
Turn up cuff. (Or for extra warmth… leave cuff unrolled if playing in the snow :)

Note about patterns: We are sharing patterns we have designed and made for our own children, families and friends. Every effort is made to share information in a clear and accurate manner. We offer preemptive apologies for any mistakes that may be made. Please let us know via comments or emails if you stumble upon a mistake or if you encounter directions that leave you scratching your head! We will rectify the situation as soon as humanly possible!

http://www.weefolkart.com
Copyright © Wee Folk Art 2008 - 2009. All rights reserved.

All photos, text and patterns are copyright protected. You may not copy, reproduce or redistribute any material found on WeeFolkArt.com without written permission. Wee Folk Art retains all rights.

Testing Pics

  
  
  The above photo is cropped at 520 x 380. Just checking to see how it looks. I want more text here to see how it wraps. I would really like the photo to fill all the space it can. I want a cleaner look to the edges.
  
    
  
  The above photo is cropped at 550x400. Just checking to see how it looks. I want more text here to see how it wraps. I would really like the photo to fill all the space it can. I want a cleaner look to the edges.
  
    
  
  The above photo is cropped at 550x380. I think this is the best size for the new web theme content box size. Below is the same size but in vert.
  
  

It's 90 Degrees in the Shade

I found myself humming Christmas songs yesterday while it was literally 90 degrees in the shade. I was camped out on the picnic table, watching the kids playing on the swings, until a sudden downpour sent up scrambling into the house. While I am not really ready for the fall and the onset of the holidays, frankly it has just recently started to feel like summer in these parts, my holiday crafting has begun.

Project number one is this beautiful Fishtail Scarf (pattern available free from Knitpicks) made from hand spun alpaca wool I received as a Christmas gift last year and since I have animal fiber allergies (so sad) I knew it had to be gifted. I think it turned out lovely and plan to make a few more scarves from this pattern.

 

One gift down.... oh... about twenty more to go.

Have you started your holiday crafting yet? What are you working on or plan to work on?

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