Wee Folk and Critters

Britta's Make-Over

Britta and I were chatting the other day, and she said she was ready for a make-over. We had tons of fun deciding on a new style, and then we both got busy stitching away. I think she looks lovely! Next week she'll model for many more photos and I'll include a tutorial. Just thought you might enjoy a little sneak peek! 

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New Gnomes in the Thicket

Although your average woodland gnome has a life expectancy of hundreds of years, that's not always the case for friends that dwell in our gnome house. Although many of them live to a ripe old age, sadly, some have been carried off by beasties, sometimes known as puppies, others have mysteriously disappeared, only to be found later by mommies when going through the pockets of wee ones that have come to visit, and, occasionally, they go off on their own journeys, perhaps to other rooms in the house, and sometimes they are even discovered in the mailbox in our fairy forest! When these wandering gnomes do return, they are always ready to share tales of their adventures! But the sad truth is... occasionally we do lose a gnome of two or three. ((heavy sign))

From time to time we invite more gnomes to join us in The Thicket. Here are a couple of new gnome friends that now reside with us. It looks like they are dressed in their finest... perhaps for a spring wedding!

To make your own Wedding Guest Gnomes, follow the general directions for making gnomes which can be found HERE.

Gather your supplies. For the capes and hats I used hand dyed felt I dyed myself. I love the variations in colors you get. I will soon be posting how I dye my felt.

Follow the general DIRECTIONS for making gnomes until you come to the capes.

Important Note: People turnings (wooden pegs) are not all created equal. Even pegs bought from the same company can be slightly different. I highly suggest you make a copy of the pattern, cut it out of paper, and “try it on” your wooden pegs. Make adjusts to the paper pattern before cutting out your felt.

Needle felt a design on the cloaks. For the flowers I used white roving and began at the center of the flower, twisting the fibers as I went to create a spiral.

Next, I added some simple leaves using green roving.

Finally, I used a very little yellow roving for the flower center.

After you have needle felted the cloaks, continue with the general DIRECTIONS.

When I was sewing the cloak to the gnome, I added little dangles I had in my bead collection. Also, you will notice that these gnomes have little dreamy eyes. Fairy will play with faceless gnomes, but she does prefer the have eyes, so I oblige :) Use a very fine tipped, waterproof marker to make the eyes. (I used my Pigma Micron 01.)


These gnomes are now ready for spring and for the gnome wedding they have been invited to! They will be given fair warning to stay away from the friendly, but sometimes too rambunctious canines!

Copyright © Wee Folk Art, LLC 2008-2014. All rights reserved. Please do not reproduce our text, images or patterns without prior written consent. You may use one or two images on your blog as long as you reference Wee Folk Art and share a direct link back to our page. Please contact us with any questions.


Photos 2-4-14

 

Big Peg Owls for Wee Hands

A few weeks ago I shared a tutorial for making Peg Owls using an "adult" size, 2 3/8" x 7/8", wooden peg. Today, I am sharing a pattern for making a Large Peg Owl, perfect for wee hands, using the large wooden pegs, 3 9/16" x 1 1/8", making them large enough not to be a choke hazard. Basically, they are made the same as the smaller gnomes. The directions and patterns for those can be found HERE. Since I've shared the tutorial before, I'm not including as many photos. If you are at all confused by a step, just check out the other tutorial, and there will be more photos.

Materials:
Large Wooden Peg - 3 9/16" x 1 1/8" purchase HERE
Wool felt
Embroidery floss in coordinating colors
Crafting glue
Stuffing material
Batting - I used thin cotton batting
Pattern

READ ALL INSTRUCTIONS BEFORE YOU BEGIN TO PREVENT MISUSE OF MATERIALS.

IMPORTANT: There can be significant variations in the sizes of the wooden pegs even from the same manufacture and even in the same shipment! Before cutting the body wraps out of felt, cut the pieces out of paper, and "try them on" your wooden pegs. Make adjustments to the paper pattern before cutting out your felt.

The pattern for the Owl Peg can be found HERE.

The tutorial on How to Cut Out Felt can be found HERE.

The Stitching Glossary can be found HERE.

NOTE: BECAUSE THIS TUTORIAL IS IDENTICAL TO THE PREVIOUS OWL PEGS, I DID NOT TAKE AS MANY PHOTOS. MANY STEPS IN THIS TUTORIAL ARE MISSING PHOTOS. CHECK OUT THE ORIGINAL TUTORIAL FOUND HERE WHERE ALL THE STEPS HAVE PHOTOS INCLUDED!

Directions:
Make a copy of the pattern.

Following the photo or your own imagination, cut out felt using the pattern.

Glue body wrap to the wooden peg. Match the bottom edge of the wrap with the bottom edge of the wooden peg.

Following the guidelines on the pattern, stitch appliques to owls body as follows:
-Stitch chest to body using a blanket stitch and 3 strands floss.
-Stitch beak to body using a running stitch and 2 strands floss.
-Stitch eyes to body using a blanket stitch and 3 strands floss.
-Add eye detail using a straight stitch and 6 strands of floss. If you would like, using the same piece of thread, you can tack down every other straight stitch in the center of the eye using a small stitch. This will help secure the stitches. (Please note: the pattern says "3 strands" of floss. I simply couldn't ask Michelle to make another PDF to fix it!)
-Add detail to the chest using a straight stitch and 6 strands of floss.

Now, with wrong sides together stitch the front of the owl's body to the back using a blanket stitch and 3 strands of floss.

Add the feather detail to the wing using a stem stitch and 3 strands of floss.

With wrong sides together, stitch a wing front to a wing back using a blanket stitch and 3 strands of floss. Only stitch the sides and bottom of the wing, DO NOT stitch the top of the wing above the "attach line". Refer to pattern. IMPORTANT: Do not cut thread!

Position a wing on the side of the owl. Use photos and patterns for positioning. Pin in place.

Using the same thread, continue blanket stitching the top of the wing, but now you will also be sewing it directly to the owl's body. Do the other wing in the same manner.

You are now done with the owl's body.

To attach the body to the peg, begin my cutting a strip of batting 1" wide. I used a thin cotton batting.

Depending on the thickness of your batting, wrap the batting strip around the peg to get the width you want. With my thin batting, I wrapped the peg twice. Cut off additional batting. Note: Use enough batting so when you slide the owl body over the peg, the owls chest is firmly stuffed. Before you glue the batting to the peg, "try the body on", by carefully sliding it over the batting, to make sure you are happy with the fit.

Place glue on the peg where the batting will go. Glue the batting to the peg. Note: If you are wrapping the peg twice, start wrapping the batting around the peg, then place more glue on the batting that is wrapped around the peg, and finish wrapping the peg. Press together and allow to dry completely before going on to the next step.

Using a small amount of stuffing, stuff the ears of the owl and place a little at the top of the head. When you place the body over the peg, you want the top of the owl's head to almost sit directly on the top of the peg. Do not over stuff!

Place glue on the batting and the top of the wooden peg and carefully slide the peg into the owl being careful not to get glue on the outside of the owl's body. Note: Position the peg so the seam of the body wrap is at the back of the owl.

Before glue dries, fuss with the owl's positioning, making sure the body is centered. Hold the owl's body against the peg until the glue begins to set. This should only tack a couple of minutes.

Allow to dry completely. Now, make a friend or two for your new owls and introduce them to your gnomes, fairies, and other woodland animals :)

 

http://www.weefolkart.com
Copyright © Wee Folk Art 2008 - 2013. All rights reserved.

All photos, text and patterns are copyright protected. You may not copy, reproduce or redistribute any material found on WeeFolkArt.com without written permission. Wee Folk Art retains all rights.

Peg Owl Tutorial

Whoooo wants a couple of adorable owls to come stay at their house? I think the real question is Whoooo wouldn't :) Using traditional wooden pegs and felt, these little guys can take their place with your gnomes, fairies and other woodland animals. And, using our basic pattern, you can personalize these wee owls to suit your fancy. Make one or make a "parliament" of owls. This duet will fit easily into my travel bag when I go visit the wee ones in Wisconsin next week. I hope they like snow :)

Materials:
Wooden pegs - 2 3/8" x 7/8" 
Wool felt
Embroidery floss in coordinating colors
Crafting glue
Stuffing material
Batting - I used thin cotton batting
Pattern

READ ALL INSTRUCTIONS BEFORE YOU BEGIN TO PREVENT MISUSE OF MATERIALS.

IMPORTANT: There can be significant variations in the sizes of the wooden pegs even from the same manufacture and even in the same shipment! Before cutting the body wraps out of felt, cut the pieces out of paper, and "try them on" your wooden pegs. Make adjustments to the paper pattern before cutting out your felt.

The pattern for the Owl Peg can be found HERE.

The tutorial on How to Cut Out Felt can be found HERE.

The Stitching Glossary can be found HERE.

Directions:
Make a copy of the pattern.

Following the photo or your own imagination, cut out felt using the pattern.

Glue body wrap to the wooden peg. Match the bottom edge of the wrap with the bottom edge of the wooden peg.

Following the guidelines on the pattern, stitch appliques to owls body as follows:
-Stitch chest to body using a blanket stitch and 3 strands floss.
-Stitch beak to body using a running stitch and 2 strands floss.
-Stitch eyes to body using a blanket stitch and 3 strands floss.
-Add eye detail using a straight stitch and 6 strands of floss. If you would like, using the same piece of thread, you can tack down every other straight stitch in the center of the eye using a small stitch. This will help secure the stitches. (Please note: the pattern says "3 strands" of floss. I simply couldn't ask Michelle to make another PDF to fix it!)
-Add detail to the chest using a straight stitch and 6 strands of floss.

Now, with wrong sides together stitch the front of the owl's body to the back using a blanket stitch and 3 strands of floss. 

Add the feather detail to the wing using a stem stitch and 3 strands of floss.

With wrong sides together, stitch a wing front to a wing back using a blanket stitch and 3 strands of floss. Only stitch the sides and bottom of the wing, DO NOT stitch the top of the wing above the "attach line". Refer to pattern. IMPORTANT: Do not cut thread! 

Position a wing on the side of the owl. Use photos and patterns for positioning. Pin in place.

Using the same thread, continue blanket stitching the top of the wing, but now you will also be sewing it directly to the owl's body. Do the other wing in the same manner.

You are now done with the owl's body.

To attach the body to the peg, begin my cutting a strip of batting 3/4" wide. I used a thin cotton batting.
 

Depending on the thickness of your batting, wrap the batting strip around the peg to get the width you want. With my thin batting, I wrapped the peg twice. Cut off additional batting. Note: Use enough batting so when you slide the owl body over the peg, the owls chest is firmly stuffed. Before you glue the batting to the peg, "try the body on", by carefully sliding it over the batting, to make sure you are happy with the fit.

Place glue on the peg where the batting will go. Glue the batting to the peg. Note: If you are wrapping the peg twice, start wrapping the batting around the peg, then place more glue on the batting that is wrapped around the peg, and finish wrapping the peg. Press together and allow to dry completely before going on to the next step.

Using a small amount of stuffing, stuff the ears of the owl and place a little at the top of the head. When you place the body over the peg, you want the top of the owl's head to almost sit directly on the top of the peg. Do not over stuff!

Place glue on the batting and the top of the wooden peg and carefully slide the peg into the owl being careful not to get glue on the outside of the owl's body. Note: Position the peg so the seam of the body wrap is at the back of the owl.

Before glue dries, fuss with the owl's positioning, making sure the body is centered. Hold the owl's body against the peg until the glue begins to set. This should only tack a couple of minutes.

Allow to dry completely. Now, make a friend or two for your new owls and introduce them to your gnomes, fairies, and other woodland animals :)


 

 

http://www.weefolkart.com
Copyright © Wee Folk Art 2008 - 2013. All rights reserved.

All photos, text and patterns are copyright protected. You may not copy, reproduce or redistribute any material found on WeeFolkArt.com without written permission. Wee Folk Art retains all rights.

Photos 2-21-13, 2-21-13

 

Peg Owls

I will be going to visit Little Lady and Little Guy in a few weeks. Of course, what proper Gammy would go calling empty handed? So, I've been already thinking about what I'd like to make for them. I want something small and light weight that will fit nicely in the small travel bag I use for train travel. Then, I thought of my owl.

I designed this little guy years ago before we started Wee Folk Art. It was an evening lark, and I don't even have a proper pattern. For years I've thought about sharing him/her here on Wee Folk Art, but just never got around to it. Well... since I want to make more, I'll be sharing the pattern soon. I plan to make 2 or 3 sizes. I want to make a couple (one for each hand) out of the large pegs for Little Guy. And I'll probably make a Mommy, Daddy, Little Lady and Little Guy owl family for LL.

Hopefully, I'll have the patterns done in the next week or two, so... if your gnomes need some feathered friends... watch for them : )

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