Wee Folk and Critters

Old World Wooden Gnomes Tutorial


The other day I shared our latest gnomes... the Old World Wooden Gnomes. In the past we've made Peg Gnomes, Knit Gnomes, Sewn Baby Gnome Dolls, and Michelle even designed Gnome Pillow Panels that you can buy from Spoonflower to sew and stuff. So, it only seems natural that we would eventually have gotten around to making wooden gnomes :)

NOTE: For general instructions on how to cut out wood, prepare it for finishing, then painting, and finishing, including the beeswax and olive oil finish recipe, check out the post HERE.


I made these from 1" ash, but you can use any medium or hardwood. Click here to download the Old World Wooden Gnome pattern. Begin by cutting the gnomes out of wood. As you will notice, they aren't perfect. The saw blade had a mind of its own, but that's okay. Even the wonky ones turned out cute :)

Although I've been working with wood for the past couple of years, and not nearly as often as I should to advance my skills significantly, I tried something new this project. I finally used the wood burner Michelle gave me for Christmas.

Trust me when I tell you I'm new to wood burning. So new I couldn't even figure how to get the tips off so I just used the one it came with! (BTW... I figured it out AFTER I was done with the project :) 

I transferred the pattern for wood burning to the wood using a pencil.



I then practiced on scrap wood. Yikes! Not as easy as I thought it was going to be!

I moved on to the "real thing" and wood burned the pieces. I did not do a perfect job, but I was reasonably certain... or at least hopeful, that it wouldn't matter when they were all done :)


When I was done wood burning the pieces, I erased the marks, then proceeded to painting.

As usual, I mixed up milk paints, and painted each a bit different. It was amazing how the burned lines made it easier to paint... the secret to "staying in the lines".


When they were dried, I finished them with my beeswax/olive oil.

They have such an Old World look to them. The wee ones pounced on them when they came over. I know I will be making a whole village!

REMEMBER: For general instructions on how to cut out wood, prepare it for finishing, then painting, and finishing, including the beeswax and olive oil finish recipe, check out the post HERE.

The actual pattern can be found HERE.

Hope you have fun and populate your house with a bunch of gnomie friends :)

http://www.weefolkart.com
Copyright © Wee Folk Art 2008 - 2011. All rights reserved.

All photos, text and patterns are copyright protected. You may not copy, reproduce or redistribute any material found on WeeFolkArt.com without written permission. Wee Folk Art retains all rights.


 

Old World Wooden Gnomes


There are two things I came to realize today. First, I'm not nearly as good as Tim at woodworking (okay, so I've known that all along!), and second, it really doesn't matter! I pulled out the jigsaw for the first time this season. I only woodwork when I can work outside. As I started cutting my first piece, I realized I was certainly NOT the master of my saw blade. It had a mind of its own, and only momentarily did it pay any mind to the neat lines I had sketched on the wood. Yikes!

As I continued, I got better, and came up with a few tricks that helped... tips that I'm sure any woodworker worth their grain of wood utilizes all the time. But, in the end, I like the messed up first one every bit as much as I do the others. Character:) Anyway, not only did I get to use my jigsaw again, but I finally opened my Christmas gift from Michelle... a wood burner. So, THAT was a humbling experience BUT I am so pleased with the overall results, that I'm willing to cut myself some slack.

As always, I used milk paint and my beeswax and olive oil finish. They have a real "old world" feel to them. They look like they belonged to your great-great-great grandpa! I will share the tutorial later in the week when I get a chance to write it up. In the meantime, just wanted to introduce you to our new wee friends!  

Big Gnomes for Little Hands Delivered


Just in the knick of time, I finished the last 2 gnomes in our series, Big Gnomes for Little Hands, and was able to take them with me on my trip last week, and give them to The Little Lady. She was quite smitten with them, and spent half her time chewing on their hats (giving them a wonderfully unique look) and half her time holding onto the hat and swinging them around. And, yes, I can speak from experience, it does hurt when you are clobbered in the nose by a 7 month old armed with a gnomie :)

Next summer, Tim and I will be building her a gnome house (and, yes, the summer of 2012 we will FINALLY do a tutorial on how to make a gnome house!). She will then be old enough to play with the smaller gnomes without fearing a choke hazard. In the meantime, she has a set of 6 rainbow gnomes, perfect for little hands.

If you know of a set of pudgy little hands that would enjoy her own set of big gnomes, the tutorials can be found below:


Heart and Cloud Gnomes

Toadstool and Sun Gnomes

Lavender and Apple Gnomes

Large Gnomes for Little Hands - Part 2

Here are the next two gnomes in our Big Gnomes for Little Hands series. For instructions on how to make these "big guys", check out the tutorial HERE. The actual pattern for our Sun Gnome and our Toadstool gnome can be found HERE.

http://www.weefolkart.com
Copyright © Wee Folk Art 2008 - 2011. All rights reserved.

All photos, text and patterns are copyright protected. You may not copy, reproduce or redistribute any material found on WeeFolkArt.com without written permission. Wee Folk Art retains all rights.

Large Gnomes for Little Hands



 

I know it probably seems like I just got back from visiting Drew, Meghan and the Little Lady in Wisconsin, but, to me it seems like forever! I've got another trip planned mid May, and since it would be impossible for me to go empty handed, I tried to decide what I wanted to make to bring. Although I really wanted to make her some our Waldorf Inspired Peg Gnomes, they still could pose a choke hazzard, so I decided to make bigger gnomes.


 

I am working on a set of rainbow gnomes for the Little Lady. Remember last year I made a set of rainbow gnomes for Pixie's birthday basket? Well, those gnomes are teeny tiny next to these! Basically, I took my standard pattern for the Waldorf Inspired Gnomes and enlarged the pattern 125%. Worked great! But I decided since these were so much larger, I wanted to embellish them with applique and embroidery. Today I am sharing the first two: Heart Gnome and Rain Gnome. Over the next couple weeks I will finish the other 4 and share the patterns as I complete them. 

The directions are very similar to the original directions with a few changes, which, BTW, could be used on the previous gnomes directions. Changes are typed in red. 

Materials:
Large People Body (wooden peg) 3 9/16" x 1 1/8"
Wool/wool blend felt - 2 main colors plus various colors for appliques
embroidery floss
crafting glue
favorite stuffing material
copy of pattern

Important Note: People turnings (wooden pegs) are not all created equal. Even pegs bought from the same company can be slightly different. I highly suggest you make a copy of the pattern, cut it out of paper, and “try it on” your wooden pegs. Make adjusts to the paper pattern before cutting out your felt.

Note: If you are making 6 rainbow gnomes, decide on the colors you will be using before you begin. Then, use only those 12 colors, plus white, when adding appliques.

Directions are the same for both gnomes:

Cut hat and cloak out of color A and body wrap out of color B. For the Heart Gnome, cut the hearts out of pink and the leaves out of green. For the Rain Gnome, cut the raindrops and cloud out of white. 

Glue body wrap to people turning. Match bottom edge of wrapping with bottom edge of turning.

Add appliques to the cloaks and hats using the pattern as a guide. Blanket stitch the outer edge of the cloaks using 6 strands of embroidery floss that matches the body wraps.

Using 2 strands of floss that match the cloak, sew a running stitch close to the neck edge on the cloak.

Gather the running stitch slightly to make it fit around the peg's neck. The back of the cloak should be centered with the back (the seamed edge) of the body wrap. Stitch closed at neck.
Using 6 strands of contrasting floss, satin stitch a closure at the neckline.

Using 2 strands of matching floss, sew the hat together using a running stitch or blanket stitch. (I used a running stitch.)

Blanket stitch the lower edge of the hat using 6 strands of embroidery floss.

Using your favorite stuffing, stuff the inside of the head stopping about 1/2" from the edge.

Place a line of crafting glue on the inside of the hat near the edge. Position the hat on the gnome tilting it slightly backward.

Give your gnome a name and introduce him or her to your household!

http://www.weefolkart.com
Copyright © Wee Folk Art 2008 - 2011. All rights reserved.
All photos, text and patterns are copyright protected. You may not copy, reproduce or redistribute any material found on WeeFolkArt.com without written permission. Wee Folk Art retains all rights.
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