Snowing Indoors

Snowing Indoors

(Our new snowflakes)

A few years ago I shared a tutorial for making snowflakes out of dollies. You can find that tutorial HERE. Originally, I had made them to hang in my preschool, so I had laminated them. Here it is, some 20 years later, and they look as fresh as the day I made them šŸ™‚

 

 


(Our 20 year old snowflakes)

I made our new snowflakes out of computer paper, ironed them, and hung them up with transparent thread. Not only are they fun to do (it’s always such a surprise to open a snowflake and see what it looks like), but they are a beautiful addition to our indoor winterscape.

This year, faced with a problem, snowflakes have seemed to save the day! We have a huge picture window in our dining room. It looks out on the back of our house. Here’s the view from that window:

Each morning (and sometimes later in the day if the weather is particularly nasty) we put out food for our backyard birds. (And squirrels, and chipmunks, and deer, and raccoons, and whatever animal is in need of nourishment!) We all like to sit around the table, with our favorite morning beverage, and watch the birds. All lovely. But here’s the problem.

Until recently, there was a cherry tree growing right outside the window. This offered protection for the birds, and most importantly, a barrier between the sky and the window. Without the tree there, that big window can look like open sky, and we have many birds bop into it. In most cases, the bird is simply rattled a bit, and they fly off. But sometimes, the results can be deadly. Last week, a female cardinal hit the window and died. We were devastated, especially since cardinals mate for life. I decided I needed to do something to alert the birds to the window.

My first thought was to put stickers on the windows. The only problem with that, is they really obscured the view. Finally, I decided to make some snowflakes, and hang them up. Not only do they provide a visual warning to the birds, but, with a heating vent right under the window, they move slightly, making it feel like it’s snowing in the house : )

Collisions with the house were almost a daily occurrence. Since putting up the snowflakes, there hasn’t been a single incident. YAY! I can leave up our snowflakes through February. In march, I’ll come up with something “springy” to dance in our windows. Okay, birdies, enjoy the meal, and stay safe.

If you’d like to make a curtain of snowflakes… or just one… check out our Traditional Snowflake Tutorial. Also, if you Google “paper snowflakes” you’ll find a ton of tutorials, many with cutting patterns. So, if you’re ready for a little winter inspiration, start with a snowflake šŸ™‚

 

 

Kimara

6 Comments

  1. I can always count on your for a nice combo of then and now. You often tug at my memory and make me think of things I did back as a kid. (Your kleenex flowers and ribbon barettes!) But I love all your gnomey, earthy crafts that I was never exposed to before. Keep up the good work. We’ve had snow for a while here and I’ve been resisting decking out the house in its winter finery, but I guess its time. We have a gray house, and it seems like all of our windows are targets for the birds but our windows by the feeder seems to get the most hits. This is a beautiful way to help out the little feathered guys. Let the clipping beginn.

  2. Your snowflakes are beautiful! Do you have a brand and size of scissors you like to use (for this project in particular, but I’d also be interested in learning for other projects as well).

    1. I always use Fiskars brand scissors. I have an assortment of them.

      http://www.amazon.com/gp/search/ref=sr_tc_srs_mi_2_1_2591904011?ie=UTF8&qid=1353078997&sr=8-2-tc-srs-mi&node=689392011&srs=2591904011&field-keywords=scissors

      Specifically, I love the razor edge ones for cutting felt. It gives a wonderful, neat edge to the felt.

      http://www.amazon.com/Fiskars-175800-1002-Razor-Edge-Softgrip-Scissors/dp/B00168A08C/ref=sr_1_6?s=arts-crafts&srs=2591904011&ie=UTF8&qid=1353079065&sr=1-6&keywords=scissors

      I have small ones for embroidery work, and large ones for cutting out patterns. I also use the garden shears outside. They also have a scissor sharpener that works well. I only use it after I've had my scissors for a long time and they are getting dull, but the edge on the Fiskars is hard and lasts a long time.

      There you have it… I'm a Fiskars girl šŸ™‚ I've used them for years. Hope that helps. 

      1. Do you know which specific style you used for the snowflakes? You got such nice detail even when cutting through multiple layers of computer paper. I too really like and use the Fiskars by the way.

          1. Thnk you for the information. I’m off to order scissors (several pairs?). Your sharing nature comes through again.

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